SOURCE: slp3D

May 03, 2007 20:18 ET

/ CORRECTION - slp3D

TYLER, TX -- (MARKET WIRE) -- May 3, 2007 -- In the news release, "REMINDER: ORLive Presents: Patent Foramen Ovale Congenital Heart Defect Repair; See Cardiologist Repair a Hole in the Heart of a U.S. Olympic Hopeful," issued earlier today by slp3D, we are advised by the company that the headline of the release should read "ORLive Presents: Patent Foramen Ovale Congenital Heart Defect Repair -- A Procedure to Close a Hole in the Heart," that the phrase "an 18-year-old woman from Houston live on www.OR-Live.com" should be removed from the first sentence of the first paragraph, and that the second sentence of the first paragraph should be deleted. Complete corrected text follows.

ORLive Presents: Patent Foramen Ovale Congenital Heart Defect Repair -- A Procedure to Close a Hole in the Heart

Live Webcast: From Trinity Mother Frances Health System Center for Advanced Surgery and Technology: May 3, 2007 at 6:00 PM CDT (23:00 UTC)

TYLER, TX -- May 03, 2007 -- On May 3 at 6 PM Central Time, Trinity Mother Frances Health System Center For Advanced Surgery And Technology (CASAT) in Tyler, Texas will host a live Webcast to repair a congenital heart defect known as a patent foramen ovale (PFO), a hole in the heart. Cardiologist David A. Hector II, MD, of Cardiovascular Consultants, PA, of Tyler, will perform the procedure and Cardiologist Brent O. Davis, MD of Cardiovascular Consultants, PA, of Tyler, will moderate.

While in utero, babies have an opening in the wall that separates the left and right atria of the heart. After birth, the hole usually closes but for those patients where the hole remains open, there are usually no side effects. A baby's lungs are not used when it grows in the womb, so the hole does not cause problems in an unborn infant. The opening is supposed to close soon after birth, but sometimes it does not. The cause of a PFO is unknown, but occurs in one in five people.

This condition is not treated unless other heart abnormalities exist or if the patient has had a stroke caused by a blood clot to the brain. Closure of the PFO usually requires surgery by a specifically trained cardiologist, who uses a special tool to permanently seal the PFO shut.

Visit http://www.or-live.com/motherfrances/1982 now to learn more and view a program preview. VNR http://www.or-live.com/rams/mof-1982-mkw-q.ram

Contact Information

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    Alex Fraser
    Director of Marketing
    slp3D, Inc. / OR-Live™
    860-953-2900 x 214
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