Correctional Service of Canada

Correctional Service of Canada

November 15, 2010 10:52 ET

2010 Restorative Justice Week: "Reflexions Past, Present and Future"

OTTAWA, ONTARIO--(Marketwire - Nov. 15, 2010) - The Correctional Service of Canada (CSC) is celebrating Restorative Justice Week from November 14 to 21, 2010 by holding events in its institutions and communities across Canada.

Restorative justice is a non-adversarial, non-retributive approach to justice that emphasizes healing in victims, accountability of offenders, and the involvement of citizens in creating healthier, safer communities.

The theme for Restorative Justice Week 2010, "Reflexions Past, Present and Future" acknowledges the beginning of a new decade as a good time to reflect on the growth and achievements of the past, to take stock of the present, and to set new objectives for the future.

Every year, CSC works collaboratively with community partners to develop a variety of complimentary resources to be shared with individuals and communities around the world to help promote Restorative Justice Week and learn about the subject matter. "CSC continues to be very active as a leader in restorative justice," says CSC Commissioner Don Head.

This year, the National Restorative Justice Symposium will be held in Regina, Saskatchewan on November 14-16, 2010 and will be hosted by the John Howard Society – Regina Council. The 2010 National Ron Wiebe Restorative Justice Award will be presented during the Symposium Banquet on the evening of November 15, 2010.

The National Symposium raises public, social, and government awareness about the use of restorative approaches and practices in addressing crime and conflict in Canadian society and the criminal justice system. This dialogue is important because it signals the significant growth of restorative justice within our country.

For further information on Restorative Justice, please visit www.csc-scc.gc.ca

Restorative Justice

BACKGROUNDER

  • Restorative justice is a non-adversarial, non-retributive approach to justice that emphasizes healing in victims, meaningful accountability of offenders, and the involvement of citizens in creating healthier, safer communities. 
  • As much as possible, restorative justice involves the victim, the offender and the community in a process which attempts to right the wrongs that result from crime, and to pave the way for more peaceful and collaborative ways of resolving conflicts in our society. 
  • Crime is a violation of people and relationships. Restorative justice works to repair this damage and promote healing and growth. They are important tools in finding more peaceful and collaborative ways of resolving conflicts in our society.
  • Examples of restorative justice processes include, but are not limited to, victim-offender mediation services, conflict resolution, healing circles, community conferencing, as well as circle processes such as Circles of Support and Accountability.
  • The concept of restorative justice has early roots at the Correctional Service Canada (CSC) in its Aboriginal and Chaplaincy Divisions. In 1996, CSC established a separate, dedicated unit to explore emerging trends and initiatives in the fields of restorative justice and dispute resolution. The first 'Restorative Justice Week' was also celebrated that year, having evolved through the years as Prisoners' Sunday and Prisoners' Week. 
  • Restorative Justice Week is celebrated in communities and at institutions all across Canada, including CSC's National Headquarters. This year's Restorative Justice Week will take place from November 14-21, 2010. 
  • In 1999, CSC established an award to honour the late Ron Wiebe, former warden of Ferndale and Elbow Lake minimum-security institutions. Mr. Wiebe was a pioneer in the field of restorative justice. This award is presented each year during Restorative Justice Week in recognition of Canadians who have demonstrated new and innovative ways of transforming human relations, through their work and/or community service, by enabling and promoting communication and healing between people in conflict including victims, offenders, colleagues, families, and neighbours.
  • The principles of restorative justice can be found in several of CSC's core values, which emphasize individual dignity, respect and potential, as well as those that recognize the importance of community connections and partnerships. The dedicated activities of CSC's Restorative Justice Division and the related work of other branches, sectors and regions, has established CSC as a prominent player in the restorative justice movement.

Contact Information

  • Correctional Service Canada
    National Headquarters Media Relations
    613-992-7711
    media@csc-scc.gc.ca