Ipsos Reid

Ipsos Reid

July 02, 2005 06:00 ET

6/10 CDNS OPTIMISTIC THAT LIVE 8 CONCERTS WILL HELP AFRICAN POVERTY

However, 59% Don't Think Canada Can Afford To Spend The Additional $12 Billion A Year That Concert Organizers Are Calling For; Only 37% Think Canada Contributes Too Little To African Poverty Relief Attention: Arts/Entertainment Editor, News Editor TORONTO, ONTARIO--(CCNMatthews - July 2, 2005) - On the day of the LIVE 8 concerts which are to take place in London, Edinburgh, Paris, Berlin, Rome, Philadelphia, Barrie, Tokyo, Johannesburg, and Moscow, a new Ipsos-Reid survey, provided exclusively to CanWest/Global, reveals that six in ten (59%) Canadians think the concerts will accomplish something and help African poverty relief.

LIVE 8 organizers are calling on the leaders of the world's richest countries-the USA, Canada, Great Britain, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and Russia-to act when they meet in Gleneagles, Scotland on 6th-9th July. The organizers say that, "by doubling aid, fully cancelling debt, and delivering trade justice for Africa, the G8 could change the future for millions of men, women and children."

However, once informed that LIVE 8 concert organizers are calling on all G8 countries, including Canada, to raise their foreign aid contributions to 0.7 per cent of their GDP by 2015, and that to reach the 0.7 figure, Canada would have to devote $15-billion a year to foreign aid, substantially more than the $3-billion it currently gives, six in ten (59%) Canadians say "that given the current state of Canada's healthcare system and other social spending programs, we simply cannot afford to spend an additional $12 billion a year on foreign aid." Conversely, one-third (34%) says that "although it is substantial increase in foreign aid spending, Canada is a rich country and has an obligation to increase foreign aid to these higher levels."

This may be underscored by the fact that only four in ten (37%) Canadians think Canada does "too little" when it comes to contributing to African poverty relief, while the same proportion (37%) says Canada does the "right amount." Just one in ten (12%) believe Canada does "too much."

These are the findings of an Ipsos-Reid poll provided exclusively to CanWest/Global conducted from June 28th to June 29th, 2005. For the survey, a representative randomly selected sample of 851 adult Canadians was interviewed by telephone. With a sample of this size, the results are considered accurate to within ±3.4 percentage points, 19 times out of 20, of what they would have been had the entire adult Canadian population been polled. The margin of error will be larger within regions and for other sub-groupings of the survey population. These data were weighted to ensure the sample's regional and age/sex composition reflects that of the actual Canadian population according to the 2001 Census data.

Six In Ten Canadians Optimistic That LIVE 8 Concerts Will Help African Poverty Relief…

Six in ten (59%) Canadians think the LIVE 8 concerts taking place on July 2nd in eight major venues with the intention of putting pressure on the G8 nations' leaders to come up with more aid for Africa, will "actually accomplish something and help African poverty relief." In comparison, one-third (34%) thinks "this type of concert event will probably not accomplish much and is probably not worthwhile." Another 6% of respondents volunteered "neither" as their response and 2% "don't know."

·Men are more likely than women to think this type of concert event is not really worthwhile (38% vs. 29%).

However, Most Don't Think Canada Can Afford To Spend The Additional $12 Billion A Year That Concert Organizers Are Calling For

Once informed that LIVE 8 concert organizers are calling on all G8 countries, including Canada, to raise their foreign aid contributions to 0.7 per cent of their GDP by 2015, and that to reach the 0.7 figure, Canada would have to devote $15-billion a year to foreign aid, substantially more than the $3-billion it currently gives, six in ten (59%) Canadians say "that given the current state of Canada's healthcare system and other social spending programs, we simply cannot afford to spend an additional $12 billion a year on foreign aid." Conversely, one-third (34%) says that "although it is substantial increase in foreign aid spending, Canada is a rich country and has an obligation to increase foreign aid to these higher levels." Another 8% "don't know" which statement is closer to their personal view.

·Canadians 35 years if age or older are substantially more likely than younger adults to think Canada cannot afford to spend an additional $12 billion a year on foreign aid (65% vs. 43%).
·Canadians with levels of education less than a university degree are much more likely than those with a university degree to think Canada cannot afford to spend an additional $12 billion a year on foreign aid (67% vs. 42%).

Only 37% Think Canada Contributes Too Little To African Poverty Relief

Only four in ten (37%) Canadians think Canada does "too little" when it comes to contributing to African poverty relief, while the same proportion (37%) says Canada does the "right amount." Just one in ten (12%) believe Canada does "too much." Another 15% "don't know" whether Canada does too much, too little, or just the right amount.

·Young adults, 18-34 years of age, are more likely than their elders to think Canada does "too little" when it comes to contributing to African poverty relief (47% vs. 34%).
·Canadians with a university education are much more likely than those with lower levels of education to think Canada does "too little" (47% vs. 32%).

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For more information on this news release, please contact:

John Wright
Senior Vice President
Ipsos-Reid Public Affairs
(416) 324-2900

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