SOURCE: American Diabetes Association

American Diabetes Association

June 17, 2010 11:07 ET

Break Your Routine -- Diabetes Forecast Offers Fun Fitness Ideas for EVERY Body

ALEXANDRIA, VA--(Marketwire - June 17, 2010) -  Everyone knows that having a fitness routine is a key component in managing your health, but what happens when you get bored or only work out certain muscle groups? Experts tell Diabetes Forecast, the consumer magazine of the American Diabetes Association, that boredom and repetition can put your workout momentum in peril. The July issue of Diabetes Forecast identifies five common workout personas (from "Bench Warmer" to "Endurance Enthusiast") and offers recommendations for changing up a too-familiar routine while decreasing your chance of suffering overuse injuries.

If you are a "Weekend Warrior," someone who tends to be physically active only on weekends, you may be at higher risk for injury. So, working in some exercise on weekdays might help your body be at its best for those weekend excursions. For people who may spend weekend mornings on a golf course, Diabetes Forecast recommends hitting a bucket of balls at the driving range one night after work during the week. Or pick something unrelated to your weekend workouts, like dancing. Can't commit to exercising before or after work? Take a lunch-break walk -- or organize a walking group!

Diabetes Forecast recommends that the "Team Player," someone who is usually involved in a group sport, try a little solo work to train muscles unused on the playing fields. Swimming, indoor rock climbing at a gym or even a martial art like karate can be just the change you need to stay motivated. Martial arts usually offer the same community aspect that people find so rewarding in team sports, while pushing each person to do his or her best. Many gyms offer beginner rock-climbing classes. The group setting reduces the intimidation factor and helps you learn to achieve personal success.

Whether you're a "Bench Warmer" or a "Gym Rat," there's always a way to break your routine and try something that will motivate your mind and body to keep working out. This doesn't mean you necessarily have to change the type of exerciser you are, but it might help you find the one thing that will really keep you dedicated: a fitness activity you truly love. "If you enjoy doing it, you're more likely to do it," says Dale Wagner, PhD, president of the American Society of Exercise Physiologists. "I'm not a runner, so I don't run. I enjoy riding a bike regardless of whether that'd be healthy for me."

The July issue of Diabetes Forecast also includes a special "How To" section on grilling like a pro -- just in time for summer cookouts! Avoid serving dried-out chicken, undercooked burgers or over-charred kebabs by familiarizing yourself with some tricks of the trade. From selecting the right tools to taking savvy steps in preparing both your grill and your ingredients, you'll master the techniques that will ensure you deserve that "Kiss the Cook" apron.

This issue of Diabetes Forecast also features articles about:

  • Star Turns: Bret Michaels rocks "Celebrity Apprentice"
  • The Science of Sweat: Is exercise the best medicine?
  • Fabulous Filters: Healthy kidneys keep the body's chemistry in balance

Diabetes Forecast has been America's leading diabetes magazine for more than 60 years, offering the latest news on diabetes research and treatment to provide information, inspiration, and support to people with diabetes. 

The American Diabetes Association is leading the fight to stop diabetes and its deadly consequences and fighting for those affected by diabetes. The Association funds research to prevent, cure, and manage diabetes; delivers services to hundreds of communities; provides objective and credible information; and gives voice to those denied their rights because of diabetes. Founded in 1940, its mission is to prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes. For more information, please call the American Diabetes Association at 1-800-DIABETES (1-800-342-2383) or visit www.diabetes.org. Information from both these sources is available in English and Spanish.

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