SOURCE: Plan A Media

February 01, 2010 09:00 ET

Edward Rogers Releases Third Solo CD 'Sparkle Lane' on Zip Records on February 2, 2010

NEW YORK, NY--(Marketwire - February 1, 2010) - On "Sparkle Lane," out on February 2, 2010, Edward Rogers presents a sublimely crafted, emotionally resonant song cycle, channeling his lifelong passion for vintage jangle-pop, folk-rock and psychedelia into personally charged, sonically distinctive music that's both deeply expressive and effortlessly accessible. The album -- Rogers' third solo effort, and his second for the independent Zip label -- is the acclaimed pop auteur's most ambitious and accomplished work yet, with 14 original compositions that seamlessly merge hard-won lyrical insight with a lifetime's worth of classic pop influences.

"Sparkle Lane" was largely penned by Rogers on his own, but also draws upon the talents of some notable kindred spirits. Don Piper, who co-produced the album with Rogers, is a celebrated songwriter and bandleader in his own right. Pete Kennedy, who adds stellar guitar work as well as co-writing three songs and mastering the album, is half of the beloved folk-pop duo The Kennedys. Bassist Sal Maida's extensive resume encompasses stints with Roxy Music and Sparks and is a member of Cracker. Keyboardist Joe McGinty has worked with everyone from the Psychedelic Furs to Ronnie Spector, and is the mastermind behind the long-running Losers Lounge series of all-star tribute shows, in which Rogers has long been a frequent performer. Claudia Chopek (violin) has toured and recorded with Moby, TV on the Radio and Bruce Springsteen, among others. And drummer Konrad Meissner's credits include work with The Silos and Graham Parker. That unique assortment of disparate talents comes together to bring Edward Rogers' creative vision to vibrant musical life on "Sparkle Lane," adding another dynamic chapter to an already impressive body of work.

The New York-based Rogers comes by his Anglophilia honestly. He spent the first twelve years of his life in Birmingham, England, where his youthful imagination was captured by the booming British music scene. But his youthful reverie was interrupted when his father abruptly moved the family to America. The resulting feelings of displacement, culture shock and geographical yearning provide much of the inspiration for "Sparkle Lane," as reflected on such numbers as the playful "Symbols 'n Mascots," the bittersweet "Passing the Sunshine," the brightly acoustic "Land of the Free" and the album's haunting title track.

"I'm motivated by the urge to make music and express myself, rather than by some abstract idea of being some kind of pop star, so I feel like I'm making music for the right reasons," the artist asserts. "I feel like this record really reflects me, more than anything I've done before, so I feel like I've achieved what I set out to accomplish."

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