Department of Justice Canada

Department of Justice Canada

May 05, 2010 16:11 ET

Government Re-Introduces Legislation to Crack Down on Organized Drug Crime

OTTAWA, ONTARIO--(Marketwire - May 5, 2010) - The Honourable Rob Nicholson, P.C., Q.C., M.P. for Niagara Falls, Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada and Mr. Daniel Petit, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice and Member of Parliament for Charlesbourg–Haute-Saint-Charles announced that legislation was re-introduced in the Senate today proposing tougher penalties for drug crimes. The bill specifically targets gangs and other organized criminal groups who participate in the illegal drug trade.

"Illicit drug production is the most significant source of money for gangs and organized crime in Canada," said Minister Nicholson. "This legislation is essential to assist law enforcement agencies in cracking down on drug producers and dealers who threaten the safety of our children, neighbourhoods and communities."

The legislation proposes mandatory jail time for offenders when, for example:

  • The offence of trafficking is carried out for organized crime purposes or a weapon or violence is involved;
  • The drug is sold to youth or the trafficking offence takes place near a school or an area normally frequented by youth; or
  • The production of the illegal drug constitutes a potential security, health or safety hazard to children or a residential community.

 "Our Government's message is clear: drug lords should pay with jail time," said Mr Petit. "Canadians can count on us to continue standing up for law-abiding citizens. We will denounce any tactics that may weaken or obstruct this important legislation."

Backgrounder: Penalties for organized drug crime act

The Government today introduced in the Senate the Penalties for Organized Drug Crime Act. The legislation provides mandatory jail time for serious drug offences, and will allow special penalties to be imposed when offences are carried out for organized crime purposes, or if they involve targeting youth. This legislation supports the National Anti-Drug Strategy's efforts to combat illicit drug production and distribution. The proposed reforms would help disrupt criminal enterprises by targeting drug suppliers.

For the purpose of this initiative, serious drug offences would include:

  • production;
  • trafficking;
  • possession for the purpose of trafficking;
  • importing and exporting; and,
  • possession for the purpose of exporting.

The Bill would amend the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act to include mandatory prison terms for drugs listed in Schedule I, such as heroin, cocaine and methamphetamine, and in Schedule II, such as marijuana. Generally, the minimum sentence would apply where there is an aggravating factor, including where the production of the drug constituted a potential security, health or safety hazard. Also, the maximum penalty for production of Schedule II drugs, e.g., marijuana, would be increased from 7 to 14 years.

The aggravating factors involve offences committed:

  • for the benefit of organized crime;
  • involving use or threat of violence;
  • involving use or threat of use of weapons;
  • by someone who has been previously convicted (in the past 10 years) of a serious drug offence;
  • in a prison;
  • by abusing a position of authority or access to restricted areas;
  • in or near a school, in or near an area normally frequented by youth or in the presence of youth;
  • through involving a youth in the commission of the offence; and,
  • in relation to a youth (e.g. selling to a youth).

The security, health and safety factors are:

  • the accused used real property that belongs to a third party to commit the offence;
  • the production constituted a potential security, health or safety hazard to children who were in the location where the offence was committed or in the immediate area;
  • the production constituted a potential public safety hazard in a residential area; and
  • the accused placed or set a trap.

Also, GHB and flunitrazepam, most commonly known as date-rape drugs, and amphetamine drugs would be moved from Schedule III to Schedule I, which would provide access to higher maximum penalties for illegal activities involving these drugs.

Exemptions for Drug Treatment Programs

The proposed legislation would allow a court to suspend a sentence while the addicted offender takes a treatment program approved by the province under the supervision of the court as outlined in section 720(2) of the Criminal Code or a Drug Treatment Court approved program. These programs encourage the offender to deal with the addiction that motivates their criminal behaviour. If the person successfully completes the treatment program, the court normally imposes a suspended or reduced sentence.

Review of the Bill

The proposed legislation states that a Parliamentary Committee would undertake a comprehensive review of the provisions and operations of the Bill two years after it comes into force.

SEE "ANNEX A" FOR THE PROPOSED NEW MANDATORY SENTENCES FOR SERIOUS DRUG OFFENCES SCHEDULE 1 DRUGS (COCAINE, HEROIN, METHAMPHETAMINE, ETC.)

SEE "ANNEX B" FOR THE PROPOSED NEW MANDATORY SENTENCES FOR SERIOUS DRUG OFFENCES SCHEDULE II DRUGS (CANNABIS AND MARIJUANA)

ANNEX A

PROPOSED NEW MANDATORY SENTENCES FOR SERIOUS DRUG OFFENCES SCHEDULE 1 DRUGS (COCAINE, HEROIN, METHAMPHETAMINE, ETC.)

  MANDATORY PENALTY  
OFFENCE         NOTES
    w/ Aggravating Factor List A(1) w/Aggravating Factor List B(2) w/ Health
and Safety
Factors(3)
 
Production 2 YEARS n/a n/a 3 YEARS  
Trafficking   1 YEAR 2 YEARS n/a  
Possession for the Purpose of Trafficking   1 YEAR 2 YEARS n/a Offence is committed for the purpose of trafficking
Importing
Exporting
1 YEAR n/a n/a n/a  
  2 YEARS        
  (if more than 1 kg of Schedule 1 substances)        
Possession For the Purpose of Exporting 1 YEAR n/a n/a n/a Offence is committed for the purpose of trafficking
2 YEARS
(if more than 1 kg of Schedule 1 substances)

ANNEX B

PROPOSED NEW MANDATORY SENTENCES FOR SERIOUS DRUG OFFENCES SCHEDULE II DRUGS (CANNABIS AND MARIJUANA)

    MANDATORY PENALTY    
OFFENCE         NOTES
    w/ Aggravating Factors- List A(1) w/ Aggravating Factor - List B(2) w/ Health and Safety Factors(3)  
Trafficking   1 YEAR 2 YEARS n/a Offence would have to involve more than 3 kg of cannabis marijuana or cannabis resin
Possession for the Purpose of Trafficking   1 YEAR 2 YEARS n/a Offence would have to involve more than 3 kg of cannabis marijuana or cannabis resin
Importing
Exporting
1 YEAR n/a n/a n/a Offence is committed for the purpose of trafficking
Possession for the Purpose of Exporting 1 YEAR n/a n/a n/a Offence is committed for the purpose of trafficking
Production - 6 - 200 plants 6 MOS n/a n/a 9 MOS Offence is committed for the purpose of trafficking.
          Maximum penalty will be increased to 14 years imprisonment
Production - 201 – 500 plants 1  YEAR n/a  n/a  18 MOS  Maximum penalty will be increased to 14 years imprisonment
Production - more than 500 plants 2 YEARS  n/a  n/a  3 YEARS  Maximum penalty will be increased to 14 years imprisonment
Production - oil or resin 1 YEAR n/a  n/a  18 MOS  Offence is committed for the purpose of trafficking

(1) Aggravating Factors List A

The aggravating factors include offences committed:

  • for the benefit of organized crime;
  • involving use or threat of violence;
  • involved use or threat of use of weapons;
  • by someone who was previously convicted of a designated drug offence or had served a term of imprisonment for a designated substance offence in the previous 10 years; and,
  • through the abuse of authority or position or by abusing access to restricted area to commit the offence of importation/exportation and possession to export.

(2) Aggravating Factors List B

The aggravating factors include offences committed:

  • in a prison;
  • in or near a school, in or near an area normally frequented by youth or in the presence of youth;
  • in concert with a youth
  • in relation to a youth (e.g. selling to a youth)

(3) Health and Safety Factors

  • the accused used real property that belongs to a third party to commit the offence;
  • the production constituted a potential security, health or safety hazard to children who were in the location where the offence was committed or in the immediate area;
  • the production constituted a potential public safety hazard in a residential area;
  • the accused placed or set a trap.

(Version française disponible)

Contact Information

  • Office of the Minister of Justice
    Pamela Stephens
    Press Secretary
    613-992-4621
    or
    Department of Justice Canada
    Media Relations
    613-957-4207
    www.canada.justice.gc.ca