Health Canada

Health Canada

December 08, 2009 09:16 ET

Health Canada Advises Consumers to Stop Using Amby Baby Motion Beds

OTTAWA, ONTARIO--(Marketwire - Dec. 8, 2009) - Due to the potential suffocation hazard posed by these products, Health Canada is advising parents and caregivers to immediately stop using Amby Baby Motion Beds, a hammock advertised for use with infants up to 12 months of age. The product's inclined sleeping surface increases the risk of the infant rolling and becoming wedged in a position where they can no longer breathe.

Additionally, the design of the Amby Baby Motion Beds' sleeping surface is unstable as all support points are connected through a single joint above the hammock. The resulting range of motion of the sleeping surface, the inclined angle of the sleeping surface and any motion of the baby on the sleeping surface can contribute to changes in the centre of gravity of the hammock. This can lead to possible entrapment in a corner or side of the product.

The Amby Baby Motion Bed consists of a steel frame and a fabric hammock which are connected by a large spring and a metal crossbar. These hammocks were only sold online through the company's website (www.ambybaby.com or www.ambybaby.ca) and were shipped directly to consumers.

Health Canada and the US CPSC are aware of two infants who died from suffocation in the United States while using these products. In the United States, there have also been three other incidents reported. One of these incidents resulted in an injury from metal fragments falling into the infant's eye. The other two incidents did not result in injury.

To date, Health Canada has not received any reports of incidents or injuries in Canada related to these products. Nevertheless, these products should be disassembled and disposed of in such a way that they cannot be used again. Consumers are also encouraged to notify Health Canada should they find these products for sale.

Health Canada recommends that children under six years of age not be placed in any hammock as infants and young children are susceptible to considerable fall, strangulation, and suffocation hazards. For more information, please see Health Canada's Policy Statement for Hammocks Intended To Be Used By Infants And Young Children (http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/cps-spc/legislation/pol/hammocks-hamacs-eng.php).

Health Canada reminds parents and caregivers that the safest place for an infant to sleep is alone in a crib. For more information on crib requirements in Canada, as well as the safe use of cribs, see Health Canada's Crib Safety Booklet (http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/cps-spc/pubs/cons/crib-lits/index-eng.php). For more information on safe sleeping practices for infants, see Health Canada's Consumer Information - Safe Sleep Practices for Infants (http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/cps-spc/advisories-avis/aw-am/sleep-sommeil-eng.php).

Under Bill C-6, the proposed Canada Consumer Product Safety Act, currently under review in the Senate, Health Canada would have new and enhanced powers, including the authority to order mandatory recalls of unsafe consumer products, require suppliers to report any serious injuries or illnesses resulting from the use of their products, and maintain product records for traceability.

For further information, consumers may contact Health Canada's Consumer Product Safety Bureau by phone toll-free at 1-866-662-0666, or by email at cps-spc@hc-sc.gc.ca (if contacting via e-mail, please indicate the province or territory from which you are corresponding).


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