SOURCE: Dept. of Water Resources

November 20, 2008 15:43 ET

Public Comment Sought on Delta Wetlands Restoration Draft EIR

Dutch Slough Tidal Marsh Project to Be Discussed at Dec. 11 Meeting

SACRAMENTO, CA--(Marketwire - November 20, 2008) - The public is invited to comment on the Dutch Slough Tidal Marsh Restoration Project Draft Environmental Impact Report (DEIR) Dec. 11 in Oakley.

The meeting will take place from 1-4 p.m. in the Oakley City Hall Council Chambers, 3231 Main Street.

Comments gathered at the meeting will be considered as a final EIR is created for the west Delta wetlands restoration project. The final EIR will be released late in the Spring of 2009.

When complete, the project is anticipated to benefit native fish, including threatened spring run Chinook salmon, endangered winter run Chinook salmon and Sacramento splittail. Additionally, the project will provide recreational benefits including public access through more than four miles of trails and a public park developed by the City of Oakley, which owns 55 acres adjacent to the restoration project.

Preparation of the DEIR was funded by the California Coastal Conservancy and the CALFED Ecosystem Restoration Program. The total project cost for restoration is anticipated to be $32 million over five years, and will be paid for by the Department of Water Resources, the California Department of Fish and Game and the California Coastal Conservancy. The project funds will come from Proposition 84, the Safe Drinking Water, Water Quality and Supply, Flood Control, River and Coastal Protection Bond Act of 2006, approved by the voters in November 2006.

A 60-day public comment period for the DEIR will close on Jan. 19, 2009.

To view the DEIR visit: http://www.water.ca.gov/floodmgmt/dsmo/ecb/maep/dutchslough.cfm

The Department of Water Resources operates and maintains the State Water Project, provides dam safety and flood control and inspection services, assists local water districts in water management and water conservation planning, and plans for future statewide water needs.