Environment Canada

Environment Canada

October 09, 2009 13:23 ET

Six Quebec Aboriginal Organizations Receive a Contribution From the Aboriginal Funds for Species at Risk Program

ROBERVAL, QUEBEC--(Marketwire - Oct. 9, 2009) - The Honourable Denis Lebel, Minister of State for the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec and Member of Parliament for Roberval−Lac-Saint-Jean, announced today on behalf of the Minister of Environment Canada, the Honourable Jim Prentice, the contribution of 210,000 dollars to six Aboriginal organizations in Quebec, including a 42,000 dollars contribution to the Conseil des Montagnais du Lac Saint-Jean as part of the Aboriginal Funds for Species at Risk Program.

This amount comes from the budget that the Government of Canada recently committed to the Aboriginal Funds for Species at Risk Program. This amount will be allocated to six projects and be used to support Aboriginal organizations and communities in building capacity to enable their participation in the protection and recovery of species at risk on Aboriginal lands.

"The Aboriginal Funds for Species at Risk Program is a concrete example of financial assistance aimed at supporting Aboriginal communities in Canada in projects targeting critical habitats of species at risk or rare plants. We are pleased to support the implementation of recovery strategies, for the benefit of species and Canadian society," declared Minister Lebel.

"More than 250 species at risk benefited from the various initiatives," said Minister Prentice. "Over the last four years, the Aboriginal Funds for Species at Risk budget gave assistance to 333 projects, for a total amount of 10.2 million dollars."

"The project developed by the Mashteuiatsh community will document the traditional knowledge of the Pekuakamiulnuatsh on the wolverine and the woodland caribou and their habitats to enrich our scientific knowledge. We are proud to contribute to protecting these species at risk within a perspective of sharing the millennial knowledge of the Pekuakamiulnuatsh," said the community relations vice-chief of the Conseil des Montagnais du Lac-Saint-Jean, Mr. Sebastien Kurtness.

There are two components to the Aboriginal Funds for Species at Risk Program: the Aboriginal Critical Habitat Protection Fund and the Aboriginal Capacity Building Fund. The key objective of these funds is to encourage meaningful involvement of Aboriginal people and communities in the implementation of the Species at Risk Act (http://www.sararegistry.gc.ca/approach/act/default_e.cfm) .

ABORIGINAL FUNDS FOR SPECIES AT RISK

The federal government's Aboriginal Funds for Species at Risk Program plays an important role in the recovery of species at risk that live on Aboriginal lands. The purpose of this program is to promote the conservation and protection of Canada's biodiversity by supporting species recovery planning, habitat protection, and overall conservation and capacity building initiatives by Aboriginal people in Canada. The key objective is to encourage meaningful involvement of Aboriginal people and communities in the implementation of the Species at Risk Act (http://www.sararegistry.gc.ca/approach/act/default_e.cfm) .

Over the last five years, the Aboriginal Funds for Species at Risk Program has funded 333 projects, for a total of 10.2 million dollars. Among over 250 listed species at risk, here are some of the species that have benefited from these initiatives:

  • The plains bison (threatened), the Vancouver Island marmot (endangered) and the mottled sculpin (special concern) in British Columbia;
  • The ferruginous hawk (threatened) and subspecies of the piping plover (endangered) in the Prairies;
  • The golden-winged warbler (threatened), the Eastern-area Fringed Orchid (endangered) and the lake sturgeon (threatened) in Ontario;
  • The woodland caribou (threatened) and the American ginseng (endangered) in Quebec; and
  • Blanding's turtle (endangered), the thread-leaved sundew (threatened) and the North Atlantic right whale (threatened) in the Canadian zone of the Atlantic.

In 2009-2010, a total of 3.3 million dollars will be allocated to 105 projects. More than 90 community organizations or groups, encompassing the First Nations, the Inuit and the Metis (band councils, organizations, alliances between nations, companies, research centres and schools) participate directly in the projects funded this year.

The Aboriginal Funds for Species at Risk Program include two funds: the Aboriginal Capacity Building Fund, which supports Aboriginal organizations and communities across Canada in building capacity to enable their participation in the conservation and recovery of species at risk, and the Aboriginal Critical Habitat Protection Fund, which supports the recovery of species and protection of important habitat on Aboriginal lands. The Funds are co-managed by Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada and Parks Canada Agency, with the cooperation of Indian and Northern Affairs Canada. Fisheries and Oceans Canada must manage the funds pertaining to aquatic projects, and Environment Canada is responsible for land projects.

You can get more information regarding the Aboriginal Funds for Species at Risk, the Species at Risk Act and Canada's strategy for protecting species at risk by visiting the following site: www.sararegistry.gc.ca.

LIST OF PROJECTS FUNDED IN QUEBEC AS PART OF THE ABORIGINAL FUNDS FOR SPECIES AT RIKS PROGRAM IN 2009-2010

ProjectRecipientFederal Contribution
Document the traditional knowledge of the Piekuakamiulnuatsh on the Kuekuatshau, (wolverine) and the Athik (woodland caribou) and their habitats Conseil des Montagnais du Lac Saint-Jean$42,000
Update the Eastern wolf and the wolverine distribution in the Abitibi-Temiscamingue and North of Quebec areas Timiskaming First Nation$31,000
Precise data collection of detected endangered species. turtle egg laying site protection and rare plants survey
and protection on Eagle Village First Nation land
Eagle Village – Kipawa$35,000
Knowledge acquisition and management plan for the woodland caribou (boreal population) of Nitassinan of the Innu First Nation of Essipit. Innu Essipit council$40,000
Search for new populations and protection of the Aster d'Anticosti on sites with high potential on ancestral Gespeg Micmac land Micmac Nation of Gespeg$17,000
Inventory and enhancement activities for turtles, fresh water mussels and hawthorns in the Odanak community Odanak Band Council$45,000

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Contact Information

  • Office of the Minister of the Environment
    Frederic Baril
    Press Secretary
    819-997-1441
    or
    Environment Canada
    Media Relations
    819-934-8008
    1-888-908-8008
    www.ec.gc.ca