Ipsos

Ipsos

November 09, 2009 09:33 ET

Two in ten (20%) Canadians say they will attend an official Remembra

Approximately 13 million Adult Canadians (54%) say They have a Direct Relative Who Has Served as a Member of the Canadian Forces During a War/Conflict or is Currently Serving in the Canadian Forces

Attention: City Editor, Education Editor, Lifestyle Editor, News Editor, Government/Political Affairs Editor TORONTO, ON--(Marketwire - Nov. 9, 2009) - Toronto, ON - In the lead-up to Remembrance Day, a new Ipsos Reid poll conducted on behalf of The Historica-Dominion Institute examines Canadians' attitudes towards remembrance and their personal connection to veterans and the Canadian Forces.

Attendance at a Remembrance Day Ceremony

Two in ten (20%) Canadians - which could represent almost 4.8 million adults - say they will attend an official Remembrance Day service on November 11th this year. Projected attendance at ceremonies rises to 26% among those who have a family member who served in the past, and 35% among those who currently have a family member in the Canadian Forces.

Attendance is up from 2008 when 16% of Canadians - which could represent up to 4 million adults - say they attended an official Remembrance Day service on November 11th last year. This proportion rises to 22% among those who had a family member serve in a past war or conflict, and to 31% among those who have a family member currently serving in the Canadian Forces.

Direct Relatives who Served or Are Currently Serving

A majority (54%) of those polled - which could represent roughly 13 million adult Canadians - say they have a direct relative who has served as a member of the Canadians Forces during a war or a conflict, or as a member of Canada's uniformed reserves:

Over 3 million adult Canadians (14%) have a direct relative who they know served in World War One.
Some 10 million adult Canadians (43%) have a direct relative who served in World War Two.
Over 2 million adult Canadians (9%) have a direct relative who served in peacekeeping assignments in places such as Bosnia, Cyprus or Haiti.
Approximately 1.7 million adult Canadians (7%) have a direct relative who served or is serving in Afghanistan
Approximately 1.4 million adult Canadians (6%) have a direct relative who served in the Korean conflict.
With Canadian deaths climbing in Afghanistan, this Remembrance Day will likely have a particularly strong meaning for many of those affected by the tragic loss of our men and women in service. Over one in ten (14%) Canadians -- representing about 3.5 million Canadians - say that they have a member of their family or direct relative who is currently an active-serving member of the Canadian Forces, in either the Army, Navy, Air Force or some other part of the Forces.

Take Two Minutes To Remember

The Historica-Dominion Institute recently launched the Take Two Minutes To Remember campaign to ask all Canadians - at home, at school, at work - to take two minutes to remember at 11 o'clock on November 11. More than 1,500 Canadians and organizations have signed up at www.historica-dominion.ca . On November 5, the House of Commons unanimously adopted a motion urging all Canadians to take part.

The proposal enjoys widespread support among Canadians. All in all, eight in ten (85%) respondents agree (57% strongly/28% somewhat) that they will observe two minutes of silence at 11 o'clock on November 11th, the proportion of whom rises to 89% among those who have a family member who is actively serving or has fought for Canada in a past conflict or war.

Seven in ten (71%) Canadians 'agree' (44% strongly/27% somewhat) that 'governments at the federal, provincial and municipal levels should make it mandatory, not voluntary, for individuals, schools, workplaces and other venues to stop and observe two minutes of silence on each November 11'.

In fact, a majority thinks it could be taken even further as six in ten (57%) agree (32% strongly/25% somewhat) that 'all public transit and cars, wherever possible, should stop in their place for two minutes at 11 o'clock on each November 11'.

These are some of the findings of an Ipsos Reid poll conducted between November 3 and 5, 2009, on behalf of The Historica-Dominion Institute. For this survey, a national sample of 1,032 adults from Ipsos' Canadian online panel was interviewed online. Weighting was then employed to balance demographics and ensure that the sample's composition reflects that of the adult population according to Census data and to provide results intended to approximate the sample universe. A survey with an unweighted probability sample of this size and a 100% response rate would have an estimated margin of error of +/-3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20, of what the results would have been had the entire population of adults in Canada been polled. All sample surveys and polls may be subject to other sources of error, including, but not limited to coverage error, and measurement error.

Remembrance Day Not as Widely Observed in Quebec…

Only seven percent (7%) of Quebecers attended an official Remembrance Day ceremony last year (compared to 16% of Canadians overall), and only 7% intend to attend an official ceremony this year (compared to 20% of Canadians overall).

Quebecers are less likely to have had a family member fight in past wars as a member of the CAF. Fully two in three (65%) Quebecers have not had a family member serve for the CAF in WWI, WWI, Korea, peacekeeping missions or in Afghanistan:

Furthermore, in Quebec, significantly fewer individuals will participate in Remembrance activities:

While most (85%) Canadians overall will observe 2 minutes of silence, only two thirds (68%) of Quebecers will do the same.

Only one half (50%) of Quebecers believe that two minutes of silence should be made mandatory for individuals, schools and workplaces compared to seven in ten (71%) Canadians overall who think so.

A minority (37%) of Quebecers support the idea of mass transit and cars stopping to observe two minutes of silence, while a majority (57%) of Canadians overall think it's a good idea.

Generational Divide…

There exist some significant differences between younger generations of Canadians and older generations when it comes to Remembrance Day and its observance:

Younger Canadians are less likely (13%) than middle-aged (23%) or older Canadians (21%) to say they'll attend an official Remembrance Day service this year.

Younger Canadians are most likely (55%) to say that they don't have a relative who fought for the CF in any of the major conflicts in which Canada participated, while middle-aged (46%) or older Canadians (38%) are less likely to say they have not had a family member serving for the CF in these missions.

Those aged 35 to 54 (90%) and 55+ (87%) are considerably more likely than those aged 18-34 (76%) to agree that they will observe two minutes of silence this November 11 at 11 o'clock.

Younger Canadians are less likely (61%) than middle-aged (75%) or older Canadians (73%) to believe that observing two minutes of silence should be mandatory for all individuals, schools and places of work.

Half of (49%) of younger Canadians support the idea of public transit and cars stopping at 11 o'clock on November 11 to observe two minutes of silence, while majorities of middle-aged (62%) or older Canadians (58%) support this idea.

For more information on this news release, please contact:

John Wright
Senior Vice President
Ipsos Reid
Public Affairs
(416) 324-2002
john.wright@ipsos.com

Marc Chalifoux
Executive Vice President
The Historica-Dominion Institute
(416) 602-9721
mchalifoux@historica-dominion.ca

Andrew Cohen
President
The Historica-Dominion Institute
(613) 875-2576
acohen@historica-dominion.ca

About Ipsos Reid
Ipsos Reid is Canada's market intelligence leader, the country's leading provider of public opinion research, and research partner for loyalty and forecasting and modelling insights. With operations in eight cities, Ipsos Reid employs more than 600 research professionals and support staff in Canada. The company has the biggest network of telephone call centres in the country, as well as the largest pre-recruited household and online panels. Ipsos Reid's marketing research and public affairs practices offer the premier suite of research vehicles in Canada, all of which provide clients with actionable and relevant information. Staffed with seasoned research consultants with extensive industry-specific backgrounds, Ipsos Reid offers syndicated information or custom solutions across key sectors of the Canadian economy, including consumer packaged goods, financial services, automotive, retail, and technology & telecommunications. Ipsos Reid is an Ipsos company, a leading global survey-based market research group.

To learn more, please visit www.ipsos.ca.

About Ipsos

Ipsos is a leading global survey-based market research company, owned and managed by research professionals. Ipsos helps interpret, simulate, and anticipate the needs and responses of consumers, customers, and citizens around the world.

Member companies assess market potential and interpret market trends. They develop and build brands. They help clients build long-term relationships with their customers. They test advertising and study audience responses to various media. They measure public opinion around the globe.

Ipsos member companies offer expertise in advertising, customer loyalty, marketing, media, and public affairs research, as well as forecasting, modeling, and consulting. Ipsos has a full line of custom, syndicated, omnibus, panel, and online research products and services, guided by industry experts and bolstered by advanced analytics and methodologies. The company was founded in 1975 and has been publicly traded since 1999.

In 2008, Ipsos generated global revenues of €979.3 million ($1.34 billion U.S.).

Visit www.ipsos.com to learn more about Ipsos' offerings and capabilities
IN: ENVIRONMENT, POLITICS

Contact Information

  • John Wright, Senior Vice President, Ipsos Reid Public Affairs
    Primary Phone: 416-324-2002
    E-mail: john.wright@ipsos.com