SOURCE: Universal Detection Technology

December 11, 2009 05:00 ET

Universal Detection Technology Files White Paper for Bioterrorism Detection Research Funding From the Department of Homeland Security

UNDT Plans to Adapt Technology Licensed From NASA's JPL for Non-Immunological Method of Identifying Bacterial Biothreat Agents

LOS ANGELES, CA--(Marketwire - December 11, 2009) - Universal Detection Technology (www.udetection.com) (OTCBB: UNDT), a developer of early-warning monitoring technologies to protect people from bioterrorism and other infectious health threats and provider of counter-terrorism consulting and training services, reported today that it has responded to the Department of Homeland Security's request for a research proposal aimed at detecting and containing harmful bioagents, such as anthrax used as bioterrorism weapons.

The Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) from the Department of Homeland Security is seeking research and development proposals in multiple Technical Focus Areas (TFAs) of bacterial biothreat antigen detection and identification. Universal Detection Technlogy will seek funding to adapt technology licensed from NASA's JPL for Non-immunological Method of Identifying Bacterial Biothreat Agents.

The threat of terrorist or criminal use of pathogenic organisms and their toxins remains of great concern in the United States. In order to address capability gaps in this area and support the Surveillance and Detection Pillar of the National Biomonitoring Architecture (NBMA), the development of rapid and specific detection methods are needed to provide reliable analysis on a variety of bacterial biothreat agents. As part of the effort to deter biological terrorism and strengthen the capabilities of the biodefense and public health laboratory response, it is important to explore both classic and alternative methods and approaches to address the critical need to rapidly detect bacterial biothreat agent antigens and toxins of interest.

Specifically, for the purposes of recovering, extracting, and preserving the antigenic signature of the agents from their associated samples; and detecting and identifying the presence of bacterial biothreat agents present in these samples using non-immunological methods of detection to analyze samples for bacterial biothreat agent antigenic material.

The Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Public Law 107-296) states that DHS S&T will "support basic and applied homeland security research to promote revolutionary changes in technologies; advance the development, testing and evaluation, and deployment of critical homeland security technologies; and accelerate the prototyping and deployment of technologies that would address homeland security vulnerabilities." Pursuant to this mission, the Chemical Biological Division (CBD) seeks technologies to prevent, detect, and defend against a biological attack. The focus of this BAA is in the area of bacterial biothreat agent detection, surveillance and identification research.

The BAA calls for proposals on research aimed at recovering, extracting, and preserving the antigenic signature of the bioagents from their associated samples; and detecting and identifying the presence of bacterial biothreat agents present in these samples using non-immunological methods of detection to analyze samples for bacterial biothreat agent antigenic material.

UNDT's technology uses a molecule unique to bacterial spores, Dipicolinic acid (DPA) which is combined with terbium ions. Exciting the combined terbium ion and DPA generates a luminescence characteristic. This is achieved by radiating the complex with ultraviolet light. This method will allow for the detection of bacterial spores using a non-immunological method.

The Commission on the Prevention of Weapons of Mass Destruction and Terrorism, headed up by former senators Bob Graham and Jim Talent ominously warned that, "A recent study from the intelligence community projected that a one-to-two kilogram release of anthrax spores from a crop duster plane could kill more Americans than died in World War II (over 400,000)." As a follow-up to this sobering news, they reported: "Clean-up and other economic costs could exceed $1.8 trillion."

"The report by former senators Graham and Talent demonstrates the alarming prospect of a biological weapon attack to the nation," said Jacques Tizabi, UNDT's CEO. "We plan to work with the DHS and other government agencies in providing the best products and technologies to combat this threat," he added.

For more information, please visit www.udetection.com or email info@udetection.com.

About Universal Detection Technology

Universal Detection Technology is a developer of monitoring technologies, including bioterrorism detection devices. The Company on its own and with development partners is positioned to capitalize on opportunities related to Homeland Security. For example, the Company, in cooperation with NASA, has developed a bacterial spore detector that detects certain biohazard substances. The Company is also a reseller of handheld assays used for detection of five bioterrorism agents, radiation detection systems, and antimicrobial products. For more information, please visit www.udetection.com.

Forward-Looking Statements

Except for historical information contained herein, the statements in this news release are forward-looking statements that involve known and unknown risks and uncertainties, which may cause the Company's actual results, performance and achievement in the future to differ materially from forecasted results, performance, and achievement. The Company undertakes no obligation to publicly release the result of any revisions to these forward-looking statements that may be made to reflect events or circumstances after the date hereof, or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events or changes in the Company's plans or expectations.

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