ACORN Canada

ACORN Canada

April 11, 2016 06:00 ET

ACORN Canada Members to Speak About Affordability at CRTC Internet Hearing

OTTAWA, ONTARIO--(Marketwired - April 11, 2016) - On April 14, 2016 ten ACORN Canada members from across the country will be presenting at a CRTC public hearing to explain why high-speed internet should be made affordable for low-income Canadians. Members of the low-income activist organization will be providing testimony that draws from personal experience, describing the sacrifices they make in order to be able to fully participate in Canada's digital environment. In February, the organization released a report summarizing 400 testimonials from low-income Canadians about how vital yet unaffordable home internet is.

A recent CRTC survey suggests that many Canadians think home internet is essential, but too pricey. Half of the survey's 29,000 respondents are dissatisfied with the price of their internet service. ACORN Canada members view affordable access to the internet as essential to improving low-income Canadians' ability to succeed in the digital economy.

"How can low-income families get out of poverty if they can't apply for jobs, or access government services? Our kids can't even do their homework," says ACORN Canada President Marva Burnett. "Access to the internet is a right, and going to the library or coffee shops are not practical solutions."

This federal public hearing follows a 2-year long campaign by members of ACORN Canada who want to see affordable internet rates for low-income Canadians. The hearing is part of the third and final phase of the CRTC's review looking at high-speed internet, affordability and access. A decision favouring broadband or high-speed internet as a basic service could mean that affordable options will be made available for low-income Canadians.

ACORN Canada - the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now, Canada - is among the nation's largest organizations of low- and moderate-income families, with over 80,000 members in more than 20 communities working together for social and economic justice.

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