SOURCE: OTSP

July 07, 2006 20:11 ET

American Academy of Dermatology Warns of Skin Cancer Risks This Summer

More Than 1 Million New Cases of Skin Cancer to Be Diagnosed This Year in U.S.

LOS ANGELES, CA -- (MARKET WIRE) -- July 7, 2006 -- Video Stream Available: mms://windowsmedia.onthescene.com/aafox.wmv

The official start of summer is a good time to educate your viewers about the importance of early detection and prevention of skin cancer. According to the American Academy of Dermatology, more than 1 million new cases of skin cancer will be diagnosed in the United States this year; and 1 in 5 Americans will develop some form of skin cancer during their lifetime. The importance of prevention and detection can't be underestimated and knowing the facts is the first step.

Facts:

--  One American dies of melanoma almost every hour (every 67 minutes).
--  An estimated 10,710 people will die of skin cancer this year, 7,910
    from melanoma and 2,800 from other skin cancers.
--  With early diagnosis and treatment, the cure rate for skin cancer
    averages 95%.
    
Melanoma is the most serious form of skin cancer. Many people examine the most sun-exposed areas of their body, the arms and legs, but it is important to check other parts of the body as well. Skin cancer can also hide in some unexpected places on the body.

While health issues are complex and involve multiple factors, we know that overexposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays is the primary cause of skin cancer. Skin cancer is one of the easiest cancers to detect in its earliest stages because the signs appear on the surface of the skin.

Video Includes:

--  Doctor/patient soundbites
--  Soundbites; Dr. Stephen P. Stone, MD, President, American Academy of
    Dermatology
--  Graphics; How to Be Sun Smart(SM) to help reduce your risk of skin
    cancer;
    
The Academy has approximately 2,000 dermatologists offering free skin cancer screenings across the country year-round. Please visit www.aad.org for more information.

Contact Information

  • For more information or hard copy, contact:
    David Sands
    323-930-5839