Amicus the Union

Amicus the Union

March 29, 2007 11:33 ET

Amicus welcomes report from Select Committee on Automotive Industry

LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM--(CCNMatthews - March 29, 2007) - Amicus union will today call on the government to address the issues raised by the findings of theTrade and Industry Select Committee on the Automotive Industry.

The Trade & Industry Select Committee report published today (Thursday 29th March 2007) confirms that there are major concerns for the future of the UK's motor industry. The report highlights the lack of investment across the industry and the continuing need for investment in training and skills if the UK motor industry is to remain competitive in the global markets.

Amicus and the Transport & General Workers Union, due to merger on 1st May this year, both gave evidence to the Committee and commented on the Report's findings published today.

Amicus National Officer, Roger Maddison says,

"The select committee's findings raises important issues which the government needs to address. The report highlights the lack of investment across the industry and the continuing need for investment in training and skills if the UK motor industry is to remain competitive in the global markets."

The Committee recognised and shared the suspicion that foreign owned companies would look to overseas closures before closing factories at home. Amicus has made this point time and time again in our demand that until the UK government provides a level playing field for workers where job security is concerned, UK jobs will remain more vulnerable when restructuring takes place."

Amicus shares the concern of the Committee that future job losses and even factory closures cannot be ruled out. Amicus calls upon the government to adopt a more robust approach in its support for manufacturing and in particular to consider how it's public procurement policy can be better utilised to support the UK motor industry in the future.

A survey of former Rover workers released by Amicus in February revealed damming evidence contradicting the Government's arguments for weak labour laws.

Since Rover closed in April 2005 23% of its former workers are still unemployed or on a training scheme and 20% of those workers who have found work are now earning the equivalent of the minimum wage compared to an average salary of Pounds Sterling 22,000 at MG Rover.

Many workers said there was no provision for financial support if they wanted to re-train. Instead many were forced to take lower paid jobs because of their immediate financial and family commitments.

Amicus has been pressing government to focus on the delivery of training in the workplace and this report identifies this as a crucial element in the future of the industry. That is why Amicus will continue to press for training to be part of the collective bargaining agenda where research has shown the involvement of trade unions has a positive impact on the delivery of training and upskilling.

The Committee also confirmed the concerns expressed previously by Amicus about the volatility and levels of energy costs on the UK and the negative impact that this was having on manufacturing.

ENDS

Contact Information

  • Amicus
    Ciaran Naidoo
    07768 931 315