SOURCE: Brain Injury Network

January 11, 2011 11:11 ET

Brain Injury Network Announces the Human Rights Issues and Concerns of People With Acquired Brain Injury From Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), Brain Cancer, Brain Illness, Stroke, and Other Forms of ABI

People With Acquired Brain Injuries Consider Their Human Rights and Their Basic Human Safety Net to Be Their Most Vital Issues

SANTA ROSA, CA--(Marketwire - January 11, 2011) - The Brain Injury Network, an all acquired brain injury survivor organization (founded 1998), has announced human rights issues important to the ABI survivor community. BIN is a USA national and international organization promoting ABI survivor collective advocacy, citizen action and human rights. People with ABI at BIN have developed a collective consciousness and have articulated many issues that need public declaration. BIN is disseminating a consumer driven policy platform. We request that other policy advocates emphasize our recommendations and work for laws, standards and procedures that will protect vulnerable people who have ABI.

"The most important thing to us is our human rights, not our role as patients or research subjects. We wish to be perceived as human beings with the same rights and desires to live safely, with the protection of law, and with the same respect and dignity that other people have," said Susan C. Hultberg, President and Executive Director of the Brain Injury Network and brain injury survivor. "Our membership has stated repeatedly that our main concern is our basic human rights and the basic human safety net. This means basic shelter, food, and medical care. It is our position that the basic human safety net for a person with incapacitating cognitive and/or physical disabilities after brain injury is even more important than community reintegrative retraining programming."

BIN is also concerned about safety, privacy, and confidentiality concerns for people with ABI, especially individuals with brain injury who participate on Internet social communities. Web administrators of social communities for individuals with brain injuries should set privacy defaults to maximum and not allow public archiving of participants' posts in search engines.

Additionally, medical, legal, government and other venues should use consistent definitions of ABI and TBI. Medical authorities should create a Post-Traumatic Brain Injury Syndrome (PTBIS) traumatic brain injury medical classification. PTBIS is an umbrella term being circulated by BIN to medical authorities in the hopes that they will utilize this new medical classification.

Other policy statements and guidelines of the Brain Injury Network may be viewed on its website at http://braininjurynetwork.org

http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/survivoracquiredbraininjury

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