British Columbia Pharmacy Association

British Columbia Pharmacy Association

March 04, 2005 16:00 ET

The British Columbia Pharmacy Association Kicks Off Pharmacist Awareness Week March 7-13, 2005


NEWS RELEASE TRANSMITTED BY CCNMatthews

FOR: BRITISH COLUMBIA PHARMACY ASSOCIATION

MARCH 4, 2005 - 16:00 ET

The British Columbia Pharmacy Association Kicks Off
Pharmacist Awareness Week March 7-13, 2005

VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA--(CCNMatthews - March 4, 2005) -

A Healthy Partnership: You and your pharmacists

Some people think that pharmacists just count pills. What they tend to
forget are the years of educational training that is required to become
a registered pharmacist in British Columbia. Following a minimum of five
years post secondary education in health and medication management, your
community pharmacist shows up ready to work as a highly trained drug
expert.

Having acquired a strong background in pharmaceutical care and
over-the-counter medications, a pharmacist's professional goal is to
help British Columbians manage their medications more effectively. Savvy
health consumers know that pharmacists provide a range of consultative
services for their patients. At any time you can discuss with your
community pharmacist proper medication use, treatment protocols and
selecting the right over-the-counter medication. Working with patients
to maximize benefits, minimize adverse affects of drug therapy and
monitoring adverse drug reactions are ways in which pharmacists care for
their patients.

Your pharmacist is an excellent source of information. This year's
Pharmacy Awareness Week theme "A Health Partnership: You and your
pharmacists" was chosen to remind consumers that your pharmacist can
help you with a variety of health concerns, including help with
conditions such as diabetes, asthma, high blood pressure or high
cholesterol. They are also there to assist with smoking cessation
programs or vitamin choices along with up-to-date advice on staying well
and preventing disease.

New and advanced medicines are developed daily with more becoming
available over-the-counter without the need of a prescription. When it
comes to taking medication properly and safely, the right information is
essential for your good health.

The British Columbia Pharmacy Association reminds you that whenever you
have questions about how to make the most of your medicine, or need help
with your health care, talk to your pharmacist.

A Healthy Partnership: You and Your Pharmacist

The benefits of working with your pharmacist are far-reaching.

An increasing number of Canadians are taking medication to control one
or more chronic conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease or asthma.
Taking your medications properly allows these conditions to be managed,
helping you feel better and minimizing long-term complications. Your
pharmacist is a medication expert and, in addition to helping you
understand your medications, can help you avoid or solve their potential
side effects.

New and advanced drugs are becoming available every day. More are
becoming available over the counter without the need for a prescription.
When it comes to taking medication properly and safely, the right
information is essential for your good health.

A Healthy Partnership: You and Your Pharmacist

If you're like millions of Canadians who've had a prescription filled
this year, you've seen first hand just one of the many services your
pharmacist provides. Your pharmacist can do much more for you than
you've come to expect.

As the most accessible health care provider in the community, your
pharmacist is often your first point of contact with the health care
system and is an excellent source of information.

In addition to advice and information about the best way to take your
medicine, your pharmacist can help you with a variety of other health
concerns, including help with conditions such as diabetes, asthma, high
blood pressure or high cholesterol. He or she can provide sound,
up-to-date advice on staying well and preventing disease. Your
pharmacist can also help with lifestyle changes...for example, quitting
smoking.

Pharmacists work in many settings: in the community pharmacy, in
hospitals, nursing homes or at the outpatient clinic. The Canadian
Pharmacists Association reminds you that whenever you have questions
about how to make the most of your medicine, or need help with your
health care, talk to your pharmacist.

Make the most of your medicine...Talk to your pharmacist

...about safety tips for storing and disposing your medications

Safe storage and disposal of your medications is important. The British
Columbia Pharmacy Association and your pharmacist offer the following
tips:

- Don't keep medication in the bathroom where heat and moisture could
damage it.

- Do keep your medication in a dry place, out of sunlight and the reach
of children.

- Always store medications in the original container.

- Ask your pharmacist whether medications should be refrigerated.

- Clear out your medicine cupboard at least once or twice a year.
Although many drugs won't harm you past the expiry date, chances are
they will have lost some of their potency over time.

- Check the manufacturer's expiry date on the container of
non-prescription medications.

- Never take or give a medication in the dark. Check the colour and
consistency of liquids, for solid particles or sediment in the bottle or
unusual odours. These can indicate drug spoilage.

- Return outdated medicines to the pharmacy for safe disposal. Never
flush them down the toilet or put them in the garbage where children or
animals can get at them.

A Healthy Partnership: You and Your Pharmacist

The British Columbia Pharmacy Association and your pharmacist remind you
that there are important steps you can take together to enjoy better
health:

- Choose a pharmacy that meets your needs and continue to use only that
pharmacy.

- Keep your pharmacist up to date on any prescription, non-prescription
or herbal or natural health products (NHPs) you are taking.

- Ask your pharmacist to help you select non-prescription medications or
herbal and NHPs.

- Take your medications as directed.

- Talk to your pharmacist if you are unsure about how to take or store
your medications or if you are having any problems with your medications.

- Never leave the pharmacy before you know the answers to all your
questions.

The next time you come into the pharmacy to buy a cough syrup or cold
remedy, something for a headache, or any over-the-counter medicine, take
the time to talk to your pharmacist to make sure it's the best way to
treat your symptoms.

Your pharmacist - the medication expert - can provide advice and
information about choosing, taking and storing your medicine so you
always get the best from it. He or she can also help you decide when not
to take medications.

-30-

Contact Information