Veterans Affairs Canada

Veterans Affairs Canada

February 22, 2007 17:02 ET

Canada Mourns the Passing of One of its Last Known First World War Veterans

OTTAWA, ONTARIO--(CCNMatthews - Feb. 22, 2007) - The Honourable Greg Thompson, Minister of Veterans Affairs, today expressed on behalf of all Canadians his condolences to the family of Canadian First World War Veteran, Lloyd Clemett. Mr. Clemett died late last night at age 107.

"Mr. Clemett was a remarkable man who remained as proud to be a Canadian as when he wore his uniform," said Minister Thompson. "In his determination to defend our freedom, he reflected the hundreds of thousands of Canadians who did extraordinary things for peace, democracy and the rule of law. It is people like Mr. Clemett who contributed to making our country what it is. We are forever grateful. Their contributions and legacy will never be forgotten."

Lloyd Clemett was born December 10, 1899 in Toronto, Ontario. He was Canada's oldest of the last three known First World War Veterans. He was also one of Ontario's last two known Veterans from the First World War.

With the passing of Mr. Clemett, Canada has only two known Veterans of the First World War: P. Dwight Wilson of Toronto, Ontario and John F. Babcock of Spokane, Washington.

Backgrounder

Private Lloyd Clemett

Lloyd Clemett was born December 10, 1899 in Toronto, Ontario. He was Canada's oldest of the last three known First World War Veterans. He was also one of Ontario's last two known Veterans from the First World War.

A bugle boy when he enlisted in January 1916, Mr. Clemett joined the 93rd Battalion in Peterborough, but soon transferred to the 109th Battalion. They were in England by July. Mr. Clemett transferred to the 12th Battalion in December and then to the Canadian Forestry Corps the following February. He served with the Corps in Le Havre, France beginning on July 12, 1917, until transferring to the 75th Canadian Infantry Battalion on October 6, 1918. They were waiting to be called into battle when the war ended.

Mr. Clemett did not arrive home until July, 1918, after the Armistice was signed due to a strike by British longshoremen. Upon his return, Mr. Clemett took advantage of courses offered by the Army to help him obtain employment as a railway agent. He lost that job during the Depression and was then hired by the old Village of Leaside, now part of Toronto, and remained there until retirement. He and his wife, Catherine, had two sons. Since August, 2004, Mr. Clemett had been a resident of Kilgour wing at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, in Toronto, Canada's largest veterans care facility.

Contact Information

  • Veterans Affairs Canada
    Janice Summerby
    Media Relations Advisor
    613-992-7468
    or
    Office of the Minister of Veterans Affairs
    Gerald A. Lefebvre
    Director of Communications
    613-996-4649