Environment Canada

Environment Canada

April 02, 2007 15:45 ET

CORRECTION FROM SOURCE-Environment Canada: Ontario Weather Review-March 2007

TORONTO, ONTARIO--(CCNMatthews - April 2, 2007) -

A correction from source is issued with respect to the release sent out on April 2, 2007 at 1301 ET. The heading in the second table for Unusual percipitation readings should read "Wettest Since" rather than "Previous Record". The complete and corrected version follows.

March is generally a time of transition and this year was no different: Though cold and snowy to start the month, springtime had arrived by the end.

Temperatures of -30 degrees C in the north, and -20 degrees C in the south, were reported during the first week. Most of the snow was also reported this first week. By the end of the month, some areas in southern Ontario boasted temperatures in the plus 20 degrees C range. The snow has all but disappeared in most areas, with the exception of some places in the snow belts and far Northwestern Ontario.

Overall, temperatures were near normal this month throughout the province, with a few locations a couple of degrees warmer than normal. Precipitation also was unremarkable in most areas. Moosonee and North Bay reported higher-than-normal precipitation - much of that allotted to the early-March snow.

Severe Weather

The month roared in with a storm in Southern Ontario on March 1 that brought a little - or a lot - of everything. Rain, freezing rain, ice pellets, snow, and thunder and lightning were all on the menu in a number of regions. The Windsor area experienced the event pretty much all as rain, with more than 45 millimetres recorded. Other locations had a significant number of hours of freezing rain, while still others experienced the event as a mixture of snow and ice pellets that included amounts up to 20 centimetres. To make matters worse, the varying forms of precipitation were blown around by gusty winds of 60 to 80 kilometres per hour.

March Break travelers returning to Ontario late on Friday, March 16 or during Saturday, March 17 felt the impacts of another large storm system which moved south of the lower Great Lakes. While the storm did bring snow to places in Ontario near Lake Erie and Lake Ontario, especially the Niagara Peninsula and portions of Eastern Ontario, the biggest impacts were felt in large American cities to our south. This caused numerous flight cancellations and delays for March Break travelers attempting to return home.

On March 18, portions of Northwestern Ontario experienced a burst of snow. A rapidly moving storm system that began in the Canadian Prairies resulted in a period of six to nine hours of very intense snowfall in the Kenora to Dryden area along the Trans-Canada Highway. The heavily falling snow combined with gusty winds from the south caused whiteout conditions. Accumulations approaching 30 centimetres were recorded in the Kenora area due to this disturbance.

These raging winter storms in the early and middle parts of the month evolved into a burst of summer-like weather on March 26 and 27. Temperatures soared into the mid-twenties Celsius in some parts of Southern Ontario. However, this air mass was also very unstable and resulted in strong thunderstorms being generated. The season's first severe thunderstorm watches were issued on these days as the Weather Centre closely monitored some of these thunderstorms, which produced small hail and some gusty winds...an early reminder of the type of weather we will see more often as spring continues...



Unusual temperature readings:

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Location Mean Temp Normal Difference Mildest Since
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Pickle Lake -7.7 -10.0 2.3 2006
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Thunder Bay -3.3 -5.5 2.2 2006
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Windsor 4.2 2.0 2.2 2004
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Wawa -4.4 -6.6 2.2 2006
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Unusual precipitation readings (in millimetres):

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Location Precipitation Normal Difference Driest Since
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Earlton 26.5 59.1 -32.6 2005
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Trenton 39.4 72.4 -33.0 2005
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Location Precipitation Normal Difference Wettest Since
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Moosonee 87.5 31.7 55.8 2006
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North Bay 106.0 65.4 40.6 2005
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Kenora 58.0 27.7 30.3 2004
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Windsor 102.8 75.0 27.8 2004
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(Egalement offert en francais)

Contact Information

  • Environment Canada - Ontario
    Laurie Thibeault
    Communications Advisor
    (905) 336-4711
    Website: www.ec.gc.ca