SOURCE: Cran-Max

Cran-Max

December 17, 2014 13:46 ET

Cran-Max PACs More Punch for UTI Prevention

KEARNY, NJ--(Marketwired - Dec 17, 2014) - Urinary tract infections (UTI) are showing up in some unusual places. From chicken to fashion magazines, the prevalence of this persistent health problem is growing for 60 percent of women (and 12 percent of men). While sage advice holds that cranberry juice or cranberry supplements help prevent UTIs that counsel may be too vague to fight off UTIs in the ever-expanding atmosphere of antibiotic resistance. Yet, there is a specific active ingredient in cranberries that has been identified to prevent bacteria from adhering to the bladder wall, particularly E. coli, called A-type proanthocyanidins (PACs), which is found in the clinically studied Cran-Max cranberry ingredient.

"When it comes to using cranberries for UTI prevention women especially need to get more savvy," said Sherry Torkos, holistic pharmacist and author of more than a dozen books on natural health and healing. "Drinking cranberry juice can be counterproductive to preventing UTIs because these juices are loaded with sugar. Concentrated cranberry supplements are more effective, but only if they have a high concentration of PACs."

A recently published study proved that the cranberry ingredient, Cran-Max has very high concentrations of proanthocyanidin, up to 55-60 mg (in one 500-milligram capsule), and has been proven to prevent bacteria from sticking to the wall of the urinary tract. PACs are potent antioxidants, and are the active component in cranberries that inhibit bacteria from attaching to the bladder wall. PACs also have the ability to create the formation of new, healthy collagen, which has a youth-enhancing effect that keeps internal organs and skin more youthful.

"Cranberries do not actually kill bacteria in the urinary tract, but they can prevent bacteria from attaching to the urinary tract walls, which is why the number of PACs present in the cranberry supplement is significant," said Torkos. "You will not get the level of PACs found in Cran-Max in cranberry juice or most other cranberry supplements."

A peer-reviewed study published in the Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy compared the effects of a commonly prescribed antibiotic to Cran-Max in women with reoccurring UTIs and found that Cran-Max was comparable to an antibiotic for UTI prevention. The study showed that taking one, 500-milligram dose of Cran-Max, starts working immediately on the UTI, in contrast to other cranberry supplements that need to be taken for a longer period of time before your system can respond.

Cran-Max is a concentrated form of raw cranberries that contains its fruit, seed, skin and juice. It is the most widely studied cranberry supplement, the first to be supported by scientific studies and has been clinically proven effective with severe cases of UTIs. No negative side effects of Cran-Max have been reported (www.cranmaxinfo.com).

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