Canadian Off-Highway Vehicle Distributors Council (COHV)

Canadian Off-Highway Vehicle Distributors Council (COHV)

May 01, 2008 08:00 ET

"Don't Blame Jake.ca"-COHV's Newest ATV Safety Campaign

TORONTO, ONTARIO--(Marketwire - May 1, 2008) - The Canadian Off-Highway Vehicle Distributors Council (COHV) launched a pilot youth ATV safety campaign on May 1, 2008 that includes print ads, posters and a Public Service Announcement (PSA) reminding adults that youth under 16 years of age should never be allowed to ride an adult-size ATV.

The Don't Blame Jake PSA will air on television during the month of May in British Columbia, Alberta, Ontario and Quebec on TSN, Sportnet, OLN, RDS and RIS as well as in the May issue of select recreational and sports magazine across Canada.

"Whether out for an afternoon or taking a family holiday - riding the trails on an ATV can be one of the most pleasant activities for any family," states Bob Ramsay, President of the COHV. "But the COHV and its member companies also know that education and training are key to enjoying safe, family fun when riding, so we've created a PSA with an important message for adults that will reinforce what kids need to know to ride safe."

And the Don't Blame Jake campaign means just what it says. You can't blame kids under16 years of age for driving an adult size ATV if parents or guardians give them permission and hand over the keys. Remember, a youth sized ATV is smaller, lighter, has speed limiters and is easier for youth to operate - all of which make for a safer, more enjoyable outing.

So the "Don't Blame Jake" campaign is asking adults to lead by example. Show your kids how to do it right by doing it right yourself. No matter how old you are or experienced you are there is always something new to learn and you will rest easier knowing that you've done everything you can to make your child a better, more proficient rider.

The Don't Blame Jake Public Service Announcement seen on TV, the Don't Blame Suzy, Tommy, Camilla and Olivier posters and the ATV youth safety print ads can be viewed when you click on the www.dontblamejake.ca website. In fact, when you're on the site, check out the interactive ATV to find out what kids need to know before they take their first, second or third ride on an age and size appropriate ATV.

For recommended guidelines and more information, contact the Canadian Off-Highway Vehicle Distributors Council. Responsible. Recreational. Family. Fun. www.cohv.ca.

The Canadian Off-Highway Vehicle Distributors Council, originally founded in 1984, is a national, non-profit, trade association, which represents the responsible interests of the major ATV manufacturers, distributors and retail outlets of OHV-related products and services of off-highway vehicles in Canada.

Fact Sheet: Important tips to follow when trail riding with children.

Children 16 and under should always ride appropriately sized ATV's.

- All ATV riders should abide by the following engine cc size and age restrictions: under 70 cc - 6 years of age and older; 70 cc to 90 cc - 12 years of age and older; over 90 cc - 16 years of age and older.

- Always supervise young people when they ride an ATV or off-road motorcycle.

- Equip every person with the proper clothing and protective gear. Helmet, gloves, knee and elbow pads and a chest protector are essential.

- Make sure that your child has completed an approved rider-training course.

- Ride only on trails that are not crowded and within his or her riding abilities.

- When riding in a group, place one adult-ridden ATV in front of the ATV ridden by your child and another adult-ridden ATV behind.

- If just one adult and child are riding, the adult-ridden ATV should be in front to better control the speed. If you have several children riding at once, try to separate them. This will reduce the chances of them competing with each other - which could create dangerous situations.

- Never carry a child on your ATV unless the ATV has been designed to carry two people.

- Always take a leisurely pace and stop often to avoid fatigue or loss of attention.

- Always bring water, a snack or two, and make sure other people know where you are going and when you expect to be back.

- By encouraging our children to be environmentally responsible, our family and future generations will be able to enjoy the beauty of our great outdoors.

- Show consideration for trailside residents.

- Remember, summer is a time of relaxation and enjoyment. Family fun and recreation starts with planning a safe trail ride for you and your children.

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