SOURCE: Barr Pharmaceuticals

December 11, 2007 08:00 ET

Eat, Drink and Be Safe on New Year's Eve

Simple Tips to Avoid Becoming a Holiday Statistic

WOODCLIFF LAKES, NJ--(Marketwire - December 11, 2007) - Most people know the dangers of drinking and driving on New Year's Eve, but fewer individuals understand that spontaneous sexual activity related to alcohol consumption carries risks, too. Unprotected sex can lead to sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) or an unintended pregnancy.

"Research suggests that college students abandon safe sex practices when they've had too much to drink," says Nancy Jasper, MD, assistant clinical professor, Department of Ob/Gyn, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. "Risky behavior could lead to serious health issues, such as STDs or an unintended pregnancy."

Dr. Jasper suggests the following tips for a safe and responsible holiday celebration:

--  The only way to prevent an STD or an unintended pregnancy is to
    abstain from sex. However, if you do have sex, always use a condom;
--  If you're legally allowed to drink, do it responsibly -- use
    designated drivers and a buddy system and definitely don't go home with
    anyone you do not know;
--  If you have unprotected sex or experience a contraceptive failure,
    remember that you can now get Plan B® emergency contraception (EC) over-
    the-counter if you're 18 or older;
--  There's even a new card that can help you buy EC more privately --
    check it out on

Practicing safe sex and being educated about your sexual health are important to overall health, and these tips can help ensure your safety for a healthy New Year's.

Plan B® does not protect against the AIDS virus (HIV) or other sexually transmitted infections. Common side effects associated with the use of Plan B® include nausea, abdominal pain, menstrual changes, dizziness, breast tenderness, and vomiting.

Please see full prescribing information. For more information, please visit or call 1-800-330-1271.