SOURCE: Emergency Veterinary Services of St. Charles

Emergency Veterinary Services of St. Charles

October 11, 2011 09:00 ET

Emergency Veterinary Services of St. Charles Warn of Increased Risk for Heatstroke in Pets

ST. CHARLES, IL--(Marketwire - Oct 11, 2011) - With record temperatures striking Chicago and the Midwest this past summer, the St. Charles emergency vet hospital cautioned pet owners to be aware of the increased risk for heatstroke in animals. The veterinary team also announced tips for keeping pets cool during heat waves and how to recognize the warning signs of heatstroke. Emergency Veterinary Services of St. Charles provides emergency and urgent care from 6:00 p.m. every night until 8:00 a.m. the next morning; the animal clinic is also open from Saturday at noon until 8:00 a.m. Monday morning.

Veterinarian Dr. Lynette D. Greenwood, an emergency vet with Emergency Veterinary Services of St. Charles, warned pet owners of the increased risk for heatstroke in animals. With summer temperatures reaching into the 90s, Dr. Greenwood cautioned owners to be vigilant and alert.

"We have seen an increased number of heatstroke cases at our emergency pet hospital," said Dr. Greenwood. "As the temperatures soar, it is important for pet owners to aware of the signs of heatstroke and do everything possible to keep their pets cool and comfortable."

The emergency vet's tips included a reminder to pet owners that pets should not be left in parked cars, where the interior temperature can reach over 120 degrees in a matter of minutes.

"Even if you are just running a quick errand in to the store, leaving your pet in the car for five minutes can lead to dehydration, exhaustion, and increase the risk for heat stroke," said St. Charles veterinarian Dr. Marsia D. Wojcikowski. "Remember, pets cannot 'sweat' like humans can to stay cool -- they can only cool off by panting or by releasing heat from their paws."

Signs of heatstroke in pets include heavy panting, glazed eyes, a deep red or purple tongue, a staggering gait, and a rapid pulse. Pet owners who suspect their pet may be overheating can try to cool their pet off with cool (not cold) water. They can also give their pet small amounts of cool water to drink or have their pet lick an ice cube.

"If you suspect your pet is overheating, it is important to do what you can to cool off your pet, and then immediately contact your veterinarian," said veterinarian Dr. Katherine C. Lingner. "Prompt care can save your pet's life."

The pet hospital also recommended pet owners take extra precautions at outdoor activities, including concerts and festivals.

"While everyone loves to take their pets along for an outdoor community event, the heat and the excitement can be a dangerous combination for pets, especially smaller dogs," said veterinarian Dr. Margaret R. Lobitz. "We encourage all pet owners to be extra vigilant and remember that sometimes the best place for your pet is in your cool, air-conditioned home."

The St. Charles pet hospital serves the communities of Aurora, St. Charles, Geneva, Elgin, Geneva, and Batavia. The emergency vet clinic is open from 6:00 p.m. every night until 8:00 a.m. the next morning, as well as from noon on Saturday until 8:00 a.m. Monday morning.

Pet owners who wish to learn more about the services at the emergency vet hospital can visit the clinic's website, http://emergencyvetservices.com.

Contact Information

  • Emergency Veterinary Services of St. Charles
    St. Charles, IL
    1-888-667-5235