SOURCE: Grass Seed USA

Grass Seed USA

September 29, 2016 09:00 ET

Experts Provide Did-You-Knows for Fall Lawn Maintenance

University Turfgrass Experts From Coast-to-Coast Offer Tips for Winter Prep and a Green Spring Lawn

SALEM, OR--(Marketwired - Sep 29, 2016) - Fall has just begun, but according to turfgrass experts from across the nation, lawn owners should waste no time in preparing their lawns for the winter weather ahead. Fall lawn care promotes good root development, enhances storage of energy reserves and extends color retention in lawns. Grass Seed USA, a national coalition of grass seed farmers and academic turf specialists, conducted a survey of university professors and turfgrass specialists from esteemed horticulture departments to gather lesser known fall lawn care tips for a healthy, beautiful lawn come spring.

"Lawn care begins to change in the fall as your lawn tries to take in as much nutrients and moisture as it can in preparation for the dormant winter months ahead," said Bryan Ostlund, Grass Seed USA executive director. "Simple lawn care chores such as reseeding, weeding, aerating and fertilizing help a lawn immensely and show nearly immediate results come spring."

Following are expert answers to the many questions common among lawn owners when approaching these fall and winterizing lawn care tasks. For a thorough guide to fall winterization prep, including information specific to your turfgrass zone, visit www.WeSeedAmerica.com/Lawn-Winterization-Tips.

  • "Fall is a great time to seed! Lawns with poor density or bare areas will become infested with weeds if you do not add more turf grass. I would suggest a mixture containing perennial ryegrass for quick germination." - Alec Kowalewski, PhD, Assistant Professor and Turf Specialist, Oregon State University
  •  "It is important to purchase quality grass seed. Make sure the seed was tested in the last six months and check that the germination rate is 85 percent or better." - Douglas Karcher, PhD, Associate Professor of Turfgrass Science, University of Arkansas
  •  "Soil temperatures need to be greater than 60 degrees for good germination. So, it is generally better to seed a bit early than later." - Grady Miller, PhD, Professor of Turfgrass Science, North Carolina State University
  •  "Have your soil tested. A soil analysis is inexpensive and provides important information about nutrient levels and soil type. Liming, fertilizing and seed selection may all depend on the results of a soil analysis." - John C. Stier, PhD, Assistant Dean for College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources, University of Tennessee
  • "Fall is also a great time for aerification or core cultivation. I would suggest using hollow tine core cultivation, pulling small core out of the soil. After you are finished you can top dress with soil, compost or even sand at a 1/4 inch depth." - Alec Kowalewski, PhD, Assistant Professor and Turf Specialist, Oregon State University
  • "Start fertilizing grass to promote recovery and growth. Approximately 75% of the annual fertilization of the grass should be applied throughout the fall to extend the green color period and reduce dormancy of the grass." - Joseph Young, PhD, Assistant Professor, Texas Tech University
  • "In the fall, 1/4 to 1/2 inch per week of water (via rainfall or irrigation) is generally sufficient to meet the turf's needs." - Grady Miller, PhD, Professor of Turfgrass Science, North Carolina State University

For more information on seasonal lawn care and the benefits of a healthy, well maintained lawn, visit www.WeSeedAmerica.com.

About Grass Seed USA
Grass Seed USA is a national coalition of grass seed farmers and academic turf specialists with a wealth of experience in studying, growing and harvesting grass and grass seed. The coalition seeks to inform and educate residential and commercial customers about the benefits of grass and best practices for responsibly growing and maintaining healthy turf. For more information, visit www.weseedamerica.com, or follow on Twitter, Facebook or Pinterest.

Contact Information