Department of National Defence

Department of National Defence

July 03, 2008 14:10 ET

Government of Canada Makes Funding Available to Address Public Safety and National Security Priorities

OTTAWA, ONTARIO--(Marketwire - July 3, 2008) - The Government of Canada announced today a call for proposals to strengthen public safety and enhance Canada's ability to prevent, prepare for and respond to various forms of terrorist threats by aiding in the development of science and technology solutions.

"The Department of National Defence is taking action to shape defence and public security capabilities," said the Honourable Peter Gordon MacKay, Minister of National Defence and Minister of the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency. "Through strategic partnerships and initiatives such as this, we are fulfilling our commitment to strengthening the security posture of Canada."

"Our Government is determined to take decisive steps to ensure the safety of Canadians against terrorism," said the Honourable Stockwell Day, Minister of Public Safety Canada. "The Government and people of Canada benefit greatly from the unique science and technology solutions delivered through this research and technology initiative as we continue our efforts to protect Canadians."

Up to $25 million will be available, under the Chemical, Biological, Radiological-Nuclear, and Explosives (CBRNE) Research and Technology Initiative, for new projects addressing a range of specific priorities identified by federal government departments and agencies that play a role in public safety and security.

Please see attached backgrounder for more information.

BACKGROUNDER

Government of Canada Makes Funding Available to Address Public Safety and National Security Priorities

Through the federal government's Chemical, Biological, Radiological-Nuclear, and Explosives Research & Technology Initiative (CRTI), up to $25 million will be available for new S&T projects to strengthen Canada's ability to prevent, prepare for, respond to, and recover from chemical, biological, radiological-nuclear and explosives (CBRNE) incidents, including terrorist and criminal acts, accidents and natural disasters.

Project proposals are sought from industry, academia, non-governmental organizations, and government institutions for all investment priorities in the following project categories:

- Technology Acceleration: Projects that aim to more rapidly commercialize technologies that are already in development in order to address key capacity gaps and deliver needed technologies into the hands of first responders in a more timely and efficient manner.

- Research and Technology Development: Projects that close the gaps in the capabilities and capacities of the science and technology (S&T) and operational communities to effectively respond to CBRNE incidents.

- Technology Demonstration: Projects that show the usefulness of new technologies by having them tested in an operational setting and providing the end-user with a "leave-behind" capability which allows them to permanently integrate the knowledge and technology acquired into their daily operations.

Investment Priorities for CRTI's 8th Call for Proposals

CRTI continues to move towards a capability-based approach and is therefore requesting proposals addressing the following priorities:

Specific Priorities

- Risk Assessment and Priority Setting

- Explosives - Threat and Capabilities

- Medical and Casualty Management

- Public Confidence and Psycho-Social Behavioral Factors

- National Security Investigation Capabilities

- Safety of the Food System

- Detection and Identification

Non-Specific Priorities

- Emerging innovative CBRNE S&T

- Exploitation of previous CRTI investments

Please visit the Defence Research and Development Canada Centre for Security Science (DRDC CSS)'s Website for a detailed description of each priority: www.css.drdc-rddc.gc.ca

Selection Process

The CRTI selection process has two phases. In the first phase, applicants submit brief synopses of their proposals (due by 12 September, 2008). The selection committee evaluates each synopsis to ensure that it is aligned with CRTI investment priorities and to identify opportunities for collaboration between proponents. Applicants whose synopses pass the first phase of selection will then be invited to submit a detailed proposal (due by 8 December, 2008). Projects selected for funding will be announced in March 2009.

Chemical, Biological, Radiological-Nuclear, and Explosives Research & Technology Initiative (CRTI)

CRTI represents the federal science community's response and commitment to providing S&T solutions to strengthen Canada's ability to prevent, prepare for, respond to, and recover from CBRNE incidents, including terrorist and criminal acts, accidents and natural disasters. CRTI was originally launched as a five-year, $170 million program, in May 2002, as part of the $7.7 billion investment the Government of Canada announced in Budget 2001 to improve Canadian security and counter terrorism efforts. In those five years, a total of $134.2 million was allocated to 136 projects through an annual competitive project selection process. An additional $150 million was leveraged through in-kind and other contributions from partners in academia, industry and other government departments. In December 2006, the initiative was renewed for another five years, receiving more than $175 million in funding.

CRTI is a horizontal, interdepartmental initiative involving 19 federal government departments and agencies who play a role in public safety and security. These departments and agencies are brought together as members of Clusters. These are groups of federal laboratories and other government representatives comprised of S&T experts - including their laboratories - who have a role to play in providing S&T advice and capabilities to protect Canadians against CBRNE threats. CRTI manages four Clusters in each of the relevant domains: Chemical Cluster, Biological Cluster, Radiological-nuclear Cluster and Explosives Cluster. An additional cluster spanning across all domains has also been created, which specializes in Forensics. Through these Clusters and their many activities, CRTI has become a public security centre of excellence for CBRNE coordination and collaboration across three Canadian S&T sectors: government, industry and academia.

CRTI is managed by the Centre for Security Science, a joint endeavor between Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC) and Public Safety Canada. DRDC is an agency of the Department of National Defence, responding to the scientific and technological needs of the Canadian Forces and national security communities. With a broad scientific program, DRDC actively collaborates with industry, international allies, academia, other government departments and the national security community.

CRTI Members

Participating departments and agencies have joined CRTI because their specific mandates and expertise are essential to the overall safety and security of Canadians. The departments and agencies participating in CRTI are: Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC), Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., the Canada Border Services Agency, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Environment Canada, Health Canada, National Research Council of Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Public Health Agency of Canada, Public Safety Canada, Public Works and Government Services Canada, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Transport Canada, the Treasury Board Secretariat and the Privy Council Office.

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