Parks Canada

Parks Canada

January 28, 2013 09:00 ET

Government of Canada Renews Efforts to Protect Canada's Historic Heritage

Parks Canada's Cost-Sharing Program helps protect national historic sites across the country

OTTAWA, ONTARIO--(Marketwire - Jan. 28, 2013) - Today, the Honourable Peter Kent, Canada's Environment Minister and Minister responsible for Parks Canada, announced the Government of Canada's renewed commitment to Parks Canada's National Historic Sites Cost-Sharing Program. Since 2009, the Program has funded a total of 115 projects, helping to ensure Canada's historic heritage can be enjoyed by future generations.

"I am very pleased to announce the renewal of the National Historic Sites Cost-Sharing Program, which has a proven record in the conservation of the country's historic heritage," said Minister Kent. "This program has not only helped to protect and improve Canada's irreplaceable national historic sites for future generations, but has also supported local economies across Canada by creating jobs and promoting tourism."

Through Parks Canada's National Historic Sites Cost Sharing Program, up to 50% of eligible costs incurred in the conservation and presentation of a national historic site are reimbursed. The continuation of the Cost-Sharing Program demonstrates the government's support for Parks Canada's mandate of protecting and presenting places of national historic significance, and fostering the public's understanding, appreciation and enjoyment of these places in ways that ensure their commemorative integrity for present and future generations.

Since 2009, the Program has provided $16.9 million in contribution funds to non-federally owned or administered national historic sites for their conservation and presentation. On average for every dollar contributed by the Program, 2.4 times the contributed amount came from other funding sources. Cost-sharing projects are aimed to address the most critical needs such as urgent stabilization, restoration and repairs to structures of national historic significance.

A recipient can be eligible to receive a maximum of $100,000 annually depending on the extent of conservation work and specific terms and conditions of a signed contribution agreement. Eligible recipients are not-for-profit organizations, aboriginal organizations and other levels of government that are owners or eligible lessees of national historic sites. The next deadline to submit an application to the Program is March 8, 2013. Additional information and application forms are available on Parks Canada's website.

Parks Canada works to ensure Canada's historic and natural heritage is protected and, through a network of 44 national parks, 167 national historic sites, and four national marine conservation areas, invites Canadians and people around the world to engage in personal moments of inspiring discovery at our country's treasured natural and historic places.

For additional information, please see the accompanying backgrounders at www.parkscanada.gc.ca under Media Room.

Parks Canada's National Historic Sites Cost-Sharing Program

Backgrounder

Parks Canada's National Historic Sites Cost-Sharing Program is a contribution program whereby up to 50% of eligible costs incurred in the conservation of a national historic site can be reimbursed. The Program assists non-federal owners of national historic sites who demonstrate a real and immediate threat to the commemorative integrity of their national historic site and for which an intervention is required in the short term to maintain the physical integrity of threatened cultural resources. A national historic site possesses commemorative integrity when it is healthy and whole, and when the site's heritage values are protected, communicated and respected. The Program supports Parks Canada's mandate of protecting and presenting places of national historic significance, and fostering the public's understanding, appreciation and enjoyment of these places in ways that ensure their commemorative integrity for present and future generations.

Since 2009, the National Historic Sites Cost-Sharing Program has provided $16.9 million in contribution funds to non-federally owned or administered national historic sites for their conservation and presentation. To date, a total of 115 projects were funded across the country that ranged from small to large and aimed to address the most critical needs such as the urgent stabilization of structures at the North Pacific Cannery in Port Edward, British Columbia; the rehabilitation of the tipple following a severe windstorm at the Atlas No.3 Coal Mine in Drumheller, Alberta; the replacement of the slate roof on Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception in Guelph, Ontario; repairs to the copper roofs and surrounding stone masonry walls on the basilica of St. Joseph's Oratory of Mount Royal in Montréal, Québec; and the restoration of the Victoria Jubilee Bandstand at the Halifax Public Gardens, in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Funding has also allowed communities, such as St. Andrew's in Manitoba, to restore long silent church bells at St. Andrew's Anglican Church through stabilization work on the tower, or to commemorate important anniversaries, such as the 100th anniversary of the arrival of Lucy Maud Montgomery at Leaskdale Manse, in Uxbridge, Ontario, with the restoration of the interior of the house. Elsewhere, funding helped to create a pool of local tradesmen with experience in heritage conservation, for example through the work on the McAdam Railway Station, in New Brunswick and work on outbuildings at Barkerville, in British Columbia.

The renewal of the Cost-Sharing Program reflects the government's desire to support job creation in the built heritage sector by providing funding for conservation of national historic sites. National historic sites contribute to tourism in over 400 communities across Canada through direct spending, visitor spending and spin-off economic activity. This Program will create opportunities for many skilled construction and conservation professionals to work on historic places across Canada for years come.

National Historic Sites of Canada Cost-Sharing Program

Backgrounder

Eligibility for Parks Canada's National Historic Sites Cost-Sharing Program

Eligible national historic sites are those that are owned, or leased from eligible owners, by non-profit organizations, not-for-profit aboriginal organizations and other levels of government. An applicant representing properties located within a historic district which is a national historic site can only submit one funding application. Ineligible applicants include those representing or applying on behalf of individuals, the federal government (i.e. federal departments and/or agencies), federally-owned national historic sites, or for-profit organizations (including condominium corporations, private residences, etc.); and those representing historic places that are not designated as national historic sites.

Eligible projects include those intended to develop technical and planning documents agreed by Parks Canada as necessary to ensure the site's commemorative integrity, and conservation projects to preserve, rehabilitate and/or restore components of a national historic site, in order to ensure its commemorative integrity. Conservation projects may also include the development and implementation of presentation projects that focus on communicating to the public the reasons for designation as a national historic site. A recipient can be eligible to receive a maximum of $100,000 annually depending on the extent of conservation work and specific terms and conditions of a signed contribution agreement.

Criteria for Parks Canada's National Historic Sites Cost-Sharing Program

Parks Canada assesses applications according to the following established criteria:

  1. Demonstrated level of threat to the commemorative integrity of the national historic site and proposed mitigation strategy or measures;
  1. Demonstrated adherence to the Standards and Guidelines for the Conservation of Historic Places in Canada (second edition) and Parks Canada's Cultural Resource Management Policy;
  1. Demonstrated need for program funds, including evidence that the project could not proceed effectively without funding from the Program;
  1. Level of financial risk associated with the project, including the financial stability/viability of the applicant, the financial management capacity of the organization, and the amount of secured matching funding in place; and
  1. Demonstrated capacity to carry out and complete the proposed activities, in terms of technical expertise, skill sets and prior experience, within a given fiscal year.

Parks Canada assesses proposals relative to other proposals received. In addition, Parks Canada reserves the right to consider geographic balance, project diversity and other Agency priorities in funding decisions.

Additional information and applications forms are available at www.pc.gc.ca/eng/progs/lhn-nhs/ppf-csp/index.aspx.

Contact Information

  • Adam Sweet
    Press Secretary
    Office of the Minister of the Environment
    819-997-1441

    Media Relations
    Parks Canada
    819-953-8371
    www.twitter.com/parkscanada