SOURCE: Green Hills Software

Green Hills Software

July 14, 2015 08:00 ET

Green Hills Software to Present and Exhibit at Embedded Systems Conference 2015 in Santa Clara, CA

SANTA BARBARA, CA--(Marketwired - July 14, 2015) - Green Hills Software, the largest independent software vendor for the Internet of Things, will exhibit and deliver technology presentations at the Embedded Systems Conference, Santa Clara Marriott, Santa Clara, CA, July 20-22, 2015. Green Hills Software will discuss and demonstrate new products and technology designed to obtain maximum security.

Green Hills Software speaker presentations include:

Tips And Tricks for Debugging
Greg Davis, Director of Engineering, Compilers
Location: Seattle/Portland
Date: Tuesday, July 21
Time: 10:00am-10:45am
There is no shortage of courses and books written on programming and software design. Yet despite the fact that developers spend 80% of their time debugging code, relatively little attention is paid to debugging. This talk goes over a number of top techniques in how to get to the bottom of problems using a modern debugger and readily available tools. Design techniques to make debugging easier are also discussed.

Software Development Strategies for Securing the Internet of Things (on Expo floor, open to all attendees)
Max Hinson, Technical Marketing Engineer
Location: Salon 1
Date: Wednesday, July 22
Time: 11:15am-12:00pm
Much of the technological innovation in IoT is centered on the protocols, standards, and applications needed to enable new capabilities. Security, however, is largely an afterthought. This talk will discuss the security and privacy challenges introduced by IoT and how developers in the IoT world can use security to gain competitive advantage in their designs and their businesses.

Securing the Connected Car (on Expo floor, open to all attendees)
Joe Fabbre, Director of Platform Solutions
Location: Salon 1
Date: Wednesday, July 22
Time: 12:15pm-1:00pm
Contrary to popular belief, it is possible to build security and reliable software for the connected car. Managing complexity with provable separation is the key. We take a look at how this is done:

  • Examine the current state of security in automotive software including analysis of several recently published attacks
  • Understand why hackers might want to target cars
  • Review a software architecture and development techniques for building provably secure software leveraging software-based separation as a foundational component of the system
  • Consider aspects beyond the software architecture, including management of the development processes, secure boot, software updates, and key management that contribute to the overall security of the system

Hack-Proofing Your C/C++ Code
Greg Davis, Director of Engineering, Compilers
Location: Seattle/Portland
Date: Wednesday, July 22
Time: 1:30pm-2:15pm
While 85% of embedded designs use C and C++, these languages are notorious for allowing unsafe code practices that give hackers a way to attack. This talk shows exactly how to keep your Internet-connected product safe by writing your code properly the first time. Well-proven tools and techniques can be used to augment any software design paradigm and to effectively hack-proof your code. Techniques include coding conventions, automatic run-time error checking, manual compile-time and run-time assertions, static analysis, and the most common mistakes to avoid.

An Army of Malware Infected Toasters: Thinking About Risk and the Internet of Things (on Expo floor, open to all attendees)
Max Hinson, Technical Marketing Engineer
Location: Salon 1
Date: Wednesday, July 22
Time: 1:30pm-2:15pm
Beyond the world of security-conscious embedded engineers, outsiders often laugh at our security warnings about the Internet of Things. And yet an outsider's questions like: 'why would hackers attack my toaster' have some validity. How do we think through the risks with Internet-enabling increasing numbers of consumer devices? This talk presents a perspective synthesized from the embedded community, the security community, and the business community: that the most economically viable attacks for an adversary are those attacks done at scale. And when hacking and malware attacks are at scale, the gain for the adversary may actually be far less than the underlying costs incurred by the manufacturer of the vulnerable device. And thus the prudent manufacturer should be incentivized to design a device hardened against such attacks. While it is likely true that hackers may have little interest in exploiting your personal toaster, an army of malware-infected toasters is an interesting target for future exploits and cybercrime.

Taming System Complexity (on Expo floor, open to all attendees)
Joe Fabbre, Director of Platform Solutions
Location: Salon 1
Date: Wednesday, July 22
Time: 2:30pm-3:15pm
Embedded system complexity is growing at a staggering rate and there are no indications that this trend will change any time soon. Complexity is to blame for schedule delays, product quality issues, and ultimately lost revenue due to these and a host of other related factors. In this talk we'll examine techniques for dealing with rising system complexity and a strategy for taming the beast.

Advanced Debugging for Embedded Linux (on Expo floor, open to all attendees)
Mike Connors, Senior Field Applications Engineer
Location: Salon 1
Date: Wednesday, July 22
Time: 3:30pm-4:15pm
Many developers of embedded Linux systems are frustrated by lack of high quality tools to enable efficient debugging. A surprisingly high number of developers resort to logging or printf debugging and the painful process of guessing what might be going wrong in their code. This talk and live demonstration features comprehensive source-level debugging from boot loaders to applications for embedded Linux on the NVIDIA Jetson Tegra K1. It will feature advanced debug techniques that give seamless visibility from application level into kernel modules and save significant time in the debugging process.

Advanced Compiler Optimizations for the Smallest, Fastest Code (on Expo floor, open to all attendees)
Greg Davis, Director of Engineering, Compilers
Location: Salon 1
Date: Wednesday, July 22
Time: 4:30pm-5:15pm
Understanding the compilation process is crucial to generating the tightest code from your source code. Compiler technology has not yet run its course, and new cutting-edge optimizations have made enormous execution and code size savings. This talk will survey some optimizations: some are old, but highly effective, while others are virtually unknown outside of the tight knit community of compiler developers. All of them are quite fascinating.

On the show floor in booth #B, Green Hills will demonstrate technology that delivers safety and security -- from IoT point-of-sale and edge devices to automotive dashboards.

High-Performance Safe Consolidation of Linux and Safety-Critical Vehicle Solutions
Consumer operating systems such as Linux and Android have rich multimedia ecosystems but do not satisfy OEM and Tier 1 requirements for robust determinism, fast-boot and security. See how INTEGRITY® Multivisor™ secure virtualization technology (running on the Renesas R-Car H2 automotive processor) shares the GPU while enabling Linux (running a navigation application) to safely run alongside a safety-critical digital instrument cluster -- both OpenGL 3D-enabled.

Securing Devices in the IoT
Running on a Freescale i.MX 6-based point-of-sale reference platform, this demonstration shows how the certified security policies of the INTEGRITY RTOS defeat RAM scraper malware recently used in credit card breaches at several major US retailers.

Advanced Debugging for Embedded Linux
Embedded Linux developers can now use sophisticated tools to dramatically improve their debugging productivity. This demo features comprehensive, source-level debugging from boot loaders to applications running on the NVIDIA Jetson Tegra K1 development board. Also shown will be advanced probe support to speed development from hardware bootstrap and Linux bring-up to full multi-threaded application debugging and everything in between.

Trace Debugging on µ-velOSity RTOS
This demonstration features the lightweight µ-velOSityRTOS running on the Freescale Qorivva MPC5748G MCU. It will highlight the debugging of complex applications using the Green Hills SuperTrace™ probe and industry-leading MULTI® development environment.

  • Program execution forward and backward through time with TimeMachine™ debugger
  • Program visualization with PathAnalyzer™ tool
  • Unobtrusive profiling through trace collection
  • View kernel objects, tasks, and resources via the OSA Explorer

For more information on Green Hills Software’s presence or to request a meeting at ESC Silicon Valley, please visit: http://www.ghs.com/events/ESCSV_2015.html.

About Green Hills Software
Founded in 1982, Green Hills Software is the largest independent software vendor for the Internet of Things. In 2008, the Green Hills INTEGRITY-178 RTOS was the first and only operating system to be certified by NIAP (National Information Assurance Partnership comprised of NSA & NIST) to EAL 6+, High Robustness, the highest level of security ever achieved for any software product. Our open architecture integrated development solutions address deeply embedded, absolute security and high-reliability applications for the military/avionics, medical, industrial, automotive, networking, consumer and other markets that demand industry-certified solutions. Green Hills Software is headquartered in Santa Barbara, CA, with European headquarters in the United Kingdom. Visit Green Hills Software at www.ghs.com.

Green Hills, the Green Hills logo, MULTI, INTEGRITY, INTEGRITY Multivisor, TimeMachine, SuperTrace and PathAnalyzer are trademarks or registered trademarks of Green Hills Software in the U.S. and/or internationally. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

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