SOURCE: Second Chance Masquerade

April 20, 2016 17:31 ET

Guests to Gather at Masquerade Event in Scottsdale to Help End Rett Syndrome

Disorder Results in Severe Impairments Affecting Nearly Every Aspect of Child's Life

SCOTTSDALE, AZ--(Marketwired - April 20, 2016) - Masqueraded guests will descend on Virtue Vice in Scottsdale on Saturday, May 7 for the 5th annual event -- the Second Chance Masquerade -- to help fund research to reverse Rett Syndrome, the most physically disabling of the Autism spectrum disorders, almost exclusively affecting girls.

Rett Syndrome is a severely disabling disorder that strikes without warning and results in almost total dependence to speak, walk, eat, and even breathe easily. The hallmark of Rett Syndrome is near constant repetitive hand movements while awake. It affects approximately 16,000 children and women in the U.S.

At the Second Chance Masquerade, guests will spend a night to remember with fantastic food and cocktails from local restaurants, mystery prizes and a live auction, as they come together to support research to reverse Rett Syndrome. 

Boys are five times more likely to be affected by Autism spectrum disorders but Rett Sydrome is one form of Autism that affects girls almost exclusively. Rett Syndrome, while rare, affects around the same number of people as ALS, Huntington's disease or cystic fibrosis, however Rett is not as well known.

Rett Syndrome is the most physically disabling of the Autism spectrum disorders, with its most devastating symptoms striking by 18 months of age. As the cascade of symptoms take hold, a child loses acquired skills, normal movement and speech, followed by a regression period that may leave the child in a wheelchair, unable to use her hands or communicate. Many suffer seizures, extreme anxiety, Parkinson-like tremors, abnormal heart and breathing patterns, disrupted sleep rhythms, and orthopedic problems.

In 2007, a paper in the journal Science described an unprecedented achievement: the reversal of Rett symptoms in a mouse model of the disorder. This outcome has revolutionized the goals of clinical Rett Syndrome research. In 2013, a gene therapy approach was discovered to deliver a healthy gene to the cells in mice that have resulted in the same reversal of symptoms. It is now realistic and urgent to focus on a cure.

Rett Syndrome Research Trust (RSRT) is a 501(c)3 organization with a single focus to make Rett Syndrome the first reversible neurological disorder. In 2012, 96% of every dollar donated was channeled directly to RSRT research programs.

The event, in sum:

WHAT: Second Chance Masquerade, where cocktail chic and elegantly masked guests will spend a night to remember with fantastic food and cocktails from local restaurants, mystery prizes and a live auction, as they come together to support research to reverse Rett Syndrome. Individual tickets are $150.

WHY: Raise funds to support research to reverse Rett Syndrome and bring novel treatments addressing the underlying pathology of Rett Syndrome to clinical trials within five years.

WHEN: Saturday, May, 7 2016, 6pm-10pm

WHERE: Virtue Vice, 7117 E. 3rd Ave., Scottsdale

EVENT WEBSITE: www.SecondChanceForSophia.org

More about Rett Syndrome: www.reverserett.org

Contact Information

  • Contact Info:
    Jim Small:
    602-770-2908

    Media Contact:
    Troy Bohlke
    480-584-2909