SOURCE: International Hyperhidrosis Society

April 24, 2008 12:51 ET

Moms Not Taking Kids' Medical Condition Seriously, Experts Find

Daughters Desperate for Dryness Bemoan Ill-Informed Moms; Nonprofit Organization's "Take 10 for 10" Program Encourages Moms to Have an Empathetic 10-Minute, 10-Question Discussion This Mother's Day With Daughters Complaining of Chronic Sweating

PHILADELPHIA, PA--(Marketwire - April 24, 2008) - Often wracked with shame, embarrassment and self-loathing, an astonishing number of young girls suffering from hyperhidrosis -- chronic excessive sweating -- find themselves victimized not only by the disease itself, but also from the difficulty in eliciting their mother's compassion and aid to effectively treat this misunderstood medical condition. This according to the International Hyperhidrosis Society (IHHS) -- a nonprofit offering the most objective, credible and timely information available on the subject along with expert and peer-based community support.

"Hundreds of thousands of teenage girls around the world suffer from hyperhidrosis, but their emotional and physical suffering is not taken seriously by uninformed mothers who dismiss their daughter's complaints due simply to being uninformed and unaware," said Lisa J. Pieretti, executive director of the IHHS. "Desperate, alone, depressed and afraid, far too many young girls ultimately suffer in silence, learning how to live with a condition that could readily be managed if they -- and their mothers -- only knew how."

Pieretti knows all too well the plight of these young survivors, as the IHHS receives hundreds of letters from girls desperate for the validation they are not getting from their mother, also pleading for a solution -- anything that will stop the incessant, uncomfortable and humiliating sweating that ruins their clothes, soaks their school papers and erodes their self esteem.

"All too often, children suffering from chronic or excessive sweating are told to 'just deal,' that 'everyone sweats,' and that they're 'making a big deal about nothing,'" notes Pieretti. "Far too many of these kids get no sympathy or help as they struggle with a serious issue that adversely impacts their quality of life."

Consider this heartbreaking note from 14-year old Jennifer, who laments, "I suffer from really sweaty hands, underarms and feet. I have been to see my doctor and he prescribed [a prescription antiperspirant] but this hasn't worked. He said that there is nothing else that can be done. My mom keeps telling me that it's natural to sweat and that it's only my hormones and I just wish she would listen to me! It's not my hormones -- it's stained clothes, wet paper and me having to wear [layers of] dark colors all the time to hide sweat patches! This isn't due to exercise or living in a hot place, and I am not overweight at all! Please help!"

To help foster dialogue on the subject between mothers and daughters, this Mother's Day the IHHS will launch "Take 10 for 10" -- a disease awareness initiative encouraging moms to take just 10-minutes out of their holiday to conduct a 10-question assessment with their daughters to discern if the child may, in fact, have hyperhidrosis -- and to generally discuss how excessive sweating has adversely impacted her daughter's life.

Mothers and daughters may download this 10-question assessment free of charge -- and generally access a wealth of information related to hyperhidrosis -- from the IHHS Web site at www.SweatHelp.org.

To help and support young people concerned -- or just curious -- about excessive sweating, antiperspirants, body odor and other taboo sweat-related subjects, the IHHS also offers a "Teen Sweat 101" -- a free 50-page, full-color workbook providing useful hyperhidrosis information along with diary pages and thought-provoking, engaging exercises, such as the "Sweat-O-Meter," "Sweat CSI" and "Color Sweatastrophe," among others.

Those interested in receiving this free workbook should contact Support@SweatHelp.org with "Teen Sweat 101" as the message subject and their complete mailing address in the body. Workbook recipients will also receive IHHS's free e-newsletter SweatSolutions -- the only newsletter available that focuses solely on hyperhidrosis.

About the International Hyperhidrosis Society

The International Hyperhidrosis Society (IHHS) is a non-profit organization promoting the awareness of and research into the condition of excessive sweating (hyperhidrosis). Through their advocacy and programming, IHHS provides sufferers with access to treatment, and educates physicians about hyperhidrosis. Founded in 2003, the goal of IHHS is to improve the quality of life and diminish the suffering of those affected by this medical condition. Those interested may access the complete IHHS Press Room online at http://www.SweatHelp.org/English/MP_Home.asp. Press contact: Merilee Kern, merilee@kerncommunications.com, 858-577-0206.

Note to Editors: Available for interview: IHHS executive director Lisa J. Pieretti, a prominent voice of authority on the subject, David M. Pariser, M.D., F.A.C.P., F.A.A.D., 2008 president-elect of the American Academy of Dermatology, and/or individuals suffering from hyperhidrosis. Campaign related high-resolution artwork available for download from www.kerncommunications.com/Ten4Ten.zip.

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