SOURCE: Atrion

February 22, 2008 07:16 ET

IT Networks Become Unreliable When Infrastructure Is Ignored, Atrion's Hebert Writes

Article Gives Three Keys to Assessing Network to Ensure Reliability and Usefulness

WARWICK, RI--(Marketwire - February 22, 2008) - Businesses that invest heavily in new technology without upgrading their network infrastructure are almost guaranteed trouble. "Soon, their overtaxed IT network becomes inadequate and unreliable, and network traffic backs up," Tim Hebert, CEO of Atrion Networking Corp., writes in Providence Business News.

Businesses must have an "always on" network infrastructure, he writes. A slow network or a network outage is no longer an option.

"When slow response time, network outages, and system downtime occur, they have real effects on the bottom line. People stop working and productivity drops. Processes can't be followed and efficiency plummets. And eventually your business stops," Hebert writes.

Easy fixes, such as hardware upgrades or buying additional capacity, don't work because network problems do not lend themselves to quick fixes. The root causes may be in the technology itself, in operational processes, in the organizational structure or failure to use best practices, says the CEO of the Warwick, R.I.-based systems integrator and network services provider.

Hebert recommends conducting a network infrastructure assessment -- "a comprehensive study of your IT infrastructure to ensure that it is strong, reliable, and ready to support the objectives of your business -- today and in the future."

Successful assessments focus on three key areas.

--  Alignment with business goals.  Aligning business needs and goals with
    the organization's IT infrastructure will improve operational efficiencies,
    reduce costs, enhances security, and help ensure regulatory compliance.
    
--  User experience.  Eliminate potential obstacles that would be present
    regardless of how much money is spent on technology.  "Technology should
    unleash the power of your people, not hold them back," he writes.
    
--  Technology and operational disciplines.  Reviewing hardware and
    software is necessary but not sufficient.  "Technology must be coupled with
    operational disciplines such as vendor management, security, problem
    reporting and escalation, system recovery, configuration management and
    change management," Hebert writes.
    

The full story can be read at www.pbn.com/private/5592ac79b0.html.

Hebert can be contacted at thebert@atrion.net or 401-736-6400.

Atrion Networking Corporation is a leading a systems integrator and network services provider in New England. Web: www.atrion.net.

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