SOURCE: Dr. Kam Habibi

October 10, 2012 06:00 ET

Kam Habibi Applauds Efforts to Use Plastic Surgery in Helping Veterans

New Developments in the Medical Field Are Allowing Many Injured American Veterans to Enjoy Recovery Options That Were Previously Unavailable; as a Surgical Professional, Kam Habibi Commends the Progressive Research and Encourages Continued Development

DEERFIELD BEACH, FL--(Marketwire - Oct 10, 2012) - While many American veterans return home with a variety of health problem, innovative professionals in the medical community have been working steadily to offer an array of reconstructive options for soldiers. A recent Fox News article highlights these efforts and notes, "From growing ears, bone and skin in the lab to face transplants and extreme plastic surgeries, the medical community has found surprising ways to heal the wounded." As the founder of Florida's Deerfield Beach Outpatient Surgical Center, Kam Habibi celebrates these developments and hopes that these breakthroughs are only a foreshadowing of medical advancements to come.

Kam Habibi explains, "Many military personnel have returned home from the wars in the Middle East with physical scars and deformities. There are many plastic surgeons using innovative approaches along with technological advances helping wounded warriors by donating their time, skills and resources." The article notes that many American citizens have also helped contribute to these developments, which according to Habibi will eventually help improve medical care for all patients. Fox News states, "Much of [these medical developments come] from taxpayer-funded research. Four years ago, the federal government created AFIRM, the Armed Forces Institute of Regenerative Medicine, a network of top hospitals and universities, and gave $300 million in grants to spur new treatments using cell science and advanced plastic surgery."

As a professional within the surgical community, Kam Habibi notes that while many researchers have previously laid out plans to bring improved care for those requiring reconstructive surgery, the recent developments in the article indicate that these options are becoming more widespread for every kind of patient. However, it may take some patience, as medical researchers await approval for more vast implication of surgical procedures.

Cathryn Sundback, director of the tissue engineering lab at Massachusetts General Hospital, tells Fox of the struggles that her lab has had in developing human ears from human cartilage. She notes that while AFIRM funding has allowed the lab to "[solve] all the technical problems," the group is now awaiting approval from the FDA to implant ears on to patients -- a process that could take up to a year. Still, Kam Habibi is impressed the progress that the medical community has made. Habibi concludes by noting the importance of supporting not only veteran care, but also medical research as a whole to help boost the amount of improved options available to patients.

ABOUT:

Kam Habibi is a board-certified chiropractor who has established several medical centers. Most recently, Kam Habibi developed and established the Deerfield Beach Outpatient Surgical Center in 2011 in Florida. In addition, Dr. Habibi has held a private practice since 1998 in Sunrise, Florida. He also maintains affiliate offices in other cities throughout Florida, including Pompano Beach, Boca Raton, Boynton Beach, Port St. Lucie, and Orlando, as well as in Atlanta, Georgia.