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September 18, 2008 06:54 ET

Learn about the U.S. Electric Power Industry 2006-2012 Beyond

LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM--(Marketwire - Sept. 18, 2008) - Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report related to the Power gen industry is available in its catalogue.

U.S. Electric Power Industry 2006-2012 Beyond

http://www.reportlinker.com/p091963/US-Electric-Power-Industry-2006-2012-Beyond.html

Only a few years ago, many industry observers, including the U.S. government's own forecasters, assumed there would be an excessive supply of electricity.

However, the current situation now assumes the possibility of future demand increases while a power crisis approaches.

American electricity demand is at an already high level, and although an economic slowdown or recession would cut the demand forecast, it is predicted that demand overall will continue to increase in the next 5 years and beyond.

Generation of 350,000 megawatts (MW) of new electricity is necessary to satisfy electricity demand in the U.S.A. in 2030, according to forecasts and predictions of the government.

Along the way, a generation increase of 80,000 MW to 90,000 MW will be necessary from 2006 to 2012.

The industry is in agreement that new power stations are needed in the U.S.A. The country must increase investment in transmission systems, while securing new baseload electricity capacity, to meet demand.

However, there is little build-out of new transmission systems, and the American power supply reserve is falling in those areas of the country where electricity regulation is relaxed.

Several factors, including the high capital cost of constructing a new baseload power station, the cost of complying with CO2 regulation, and an opaque feeling about fuel prices, have become disincentives for building new capacity.

The Bush administration encourages investment in all renewable energy, including nuclear power generation, in order to reduce U.S. dependence on imports of crude oil. The administration provides incentives on the taxation side for that purpose.

In addition, rising concerns about a global environment problem and climate change are pushing renewable energy to the forefront as the most important problem for the electric power industry, and politicians, to address.

This research report looks at the changes in the economic structure of the U.S. electric power industry and the situation of power generation /transmission /supply, using a high estimate that the electricity industry will need to generate 1,420,000 MW of electricity in 2030, up from 1,070,000 MW of generation in 2006. The report also covers electricity marketing, growth predictions for the electricity market, growth predictions for the renewable energy market, and the outlook for U.S. energy strategy from the perspective of potential future laws and regulations.


Current Situation Assessment 2006-2012 and Beyond Outlook Sources Used for
 This Report 

1. Overview of Current Regulation & Deregulation and Future Regulation
 that Will Have Great Impact on Industry 

2. Structure and Overview 
2.1 Overview of the Power Industry in the U.S. 
2.2 Main Segments of the U.S. Power Industry 
2.3 Structure of the U.S. Power Industry Hierarchy of Industry Participants
 and Their Roles 

3.Power Production 
Table 3-1 Electric Power Producers by Sector, 2005
 (most recent data available) 
Chart 3-1 Electric Power Producers by Sector 2006 
Table 3-2 Ownership of Power Production Facilities According to NERC
 Regions 2006 

4.Power Production by Fuel Source 
Table 4-1 Source of Energy Used in Production of Electricity,
 2006 
Chart 4-1 Source of Energy Used in Production of Electricity,
 2006 
Advantages/Disadvantages of Various Fuel Sources 

5.Transmission 
5.1 Management and Regulation of the Power 

6.Power Distribution 

7.Types of Utilities by Function 

7.1 Generate, Transmit and Distribute 
7.2 Generate and Transmit Only 
7.3 Transmit and Distribute Only 
7.4 Generate Only 
7.5 Distribute Only 

8. Effect of Deregulation on Consumers 

9. Growth of Power Marketing 
Table 9-1 Companies Licensed to Market Power in the Open Markets 
Table 9-2 Projected Growth of Power Marketers, 2006-2012 Beyond 
Chart 9-1 Projected Growth of Power Marketers, 2006-2012 Beyond 
Chart 9-2 Projected Growth of Megawatt Hours of Power Sold by
 Power Marketers,2006-2012 Beyond 

10.Growth Projections, 2006-2012 Beyond 
10.1 Opportunities in Independent Power Generation, 2006-2012
 Beyond 
Table 10-1 Projected Growth of Electricity Demand 
Table 10-2 Projected Growth of Electricity Produced by Utilities 
Table 10-3 Projected Growth of Electricity Produced by Non-Utilities 
Table 10-4 Projected Growth of Electricity Produced by Utilities
 and Non-Utilities 
Table 10-5 Projected Growth of Electricity Produced by Co-Generators 
Table 10-6 Projected Growth of Electricity Produced by Small Power
 Producers 
Table 10-7 Projected Growth of Electricity Produced by
 Merchant Generators/Independent Power Producers 
Table 10-8 Projected Growth of Electricity Produced by
 Shareholder - Owned Utilities 
Table 10-9 Projected Growth of Electricity Produced by Cooperatives 
Table 10-10 Projected Growth of Internal Combustion Based Power
 Production in the Facilities Owned by Non-Utilities 
Table 10-11 Projected Growth of Internal Combustion Based Power
 Production in the Facilities Owned by Non-Utilities 
Table 10-12 Projected Growth of Internal Combustion Based Power
 Production in the Facilities Owned by IPP/Merchant Producers 
Table 10-13 Projected Growth of Internal Combustion Based Power
 Production in the Facilities Owned by IPP/Merchant Producers 
Table 10-14 Projected Growth of Combined Cycle Based Power
 Production in the Facilities Owned by Non-Utilities 
Table 10-15 Projected Growth of Combined Cycle Based Power
 Production in the Facilities Owned by Non-Utilities 
Table 10-16 Projected Growth of Combined Cycle Power
 Production in the Facilities Owned by IPP/Merchant Producers 
Table 10-17 Projected Growth of Combined Cycle Power
 Production in the Facilities Owned by IPP/Merchant Producers 
Table 10-18 Projected Growth of Steam Based Power
 Production in the Facilities Owned by Non-Utilities 
Table 10-19 Projected Growth of Steam Based Power
 Production in the Facilities Owned by Non-Utilities 
Table 10-20 Projected Growth of Steam Based Power
 Production in the Facilities Owned by IPP/Merchant Producers 
Table 10-21 Projected Growth of Steam Based Power
 Production in the Facilities Owned by IPP/Merchant Producers 
Table 10-22 Projected Growth of Gas Turbine Based
 Power Production in the Facilities Owned by Non-Utilities 
Table 10-23 Projected Growth of Gas Turbine Based
 Power Production in the Facilities Owned by Non-Utilities 
Table 10-24 Projected Growth of Gas Turbine Based Power
 Production in the Facilities Owned by IPP/Merchant Producers 
Table 10-25 Projected Growth of Gas Turbine Based Power
 Production in the Facilities Owned by IPP/Merchant Producers 

11.Growth Projections for Independent Power Production by
 Fuel Source 
11.1 Issues Related to Power Source, 2006-2012 Beyond 
Table 11-1 Projected Growth of Number of Nuclear Power Plants 
Table 11-2 Projected Growth of Power Production by Nuclear
 Power Plants 
Table 11-3 Projected Growth of Number of Solar Power Plants 
Table 11-4 Projected Growth of Power Production of Solar Power
 Plants 
Table 11-5 Projected Growth of Number of Geo-Thermal Power Plants 
Table 11-6 Projected Growth of Power Production by Geo-Thermal Power
 Plants 
Table 11-7 Projected Growth of Number of Wind-Power Plants 
Table 11-8 Projected Growth of Power Production by Wind-Power Power
 Plants 
Table 11-9 Projected Growth of Number of Bio-Mass Power Plants 
Table 11-10 Projected Growth of Power Production by Bio-Mass Power
 Plants 

12.Energy Strategy in the Future 
12.1 Overall Strategy 
12.2 IPP Strategy

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U.S. Electric Power Industry 2006-2012 Beyond

http://www.reportlinker.com/p091963/US-Electric-Power-Industry-2006-2012-Beyond.html

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