SOURCE: MATECH Corp.

MATECH Corp.

October 12, 2009 07:30 ET

MATECH to Penetrate New Bridge Monitoring Markets by Developing Longer Lasting Electrolyte Gel

Enhancements Will Increase Worldwide Use of Its EFS System

LOS ANGELES, CA--(Marketwire - October 12, 2009) - MATECH Corp. (OTCBB: MTCH) (www.matechcorp.com) is pleased to announce that the Company is currently working on enhancements to its Electrochemical Fatigue Sensor (EFS) Technology, including the development of a long-term electrolyte gel. MATECH's EFS System has proven its efficacy on over 35 bridges in 10 different states. It is currently the only nondestructive method on the market able to detect growing cracks in bridges as small as 0.01 inches.

Another enhancement in the planning stage is to quantify the crack growth rate of detected cracks. EFS now provides a qualitative estimate of the crack growth rate, a quantitative knowledge of the crack growth rate would benefit bridge owners tremendously.

Currently, MATECH's EFS is used to detect growing cracks in bridges using a procedure that requires only a few hours. The electrolyte gel, a key element of the EFS System, has a lifespan of about a week. While this is ample time for MATECH to complete the inspection and locate growing cracks undetected by current methods of bridge inspection, MATECH is looking to offer a system that provides continuous structural health monitoring. Such a system will indicate growing cracks at the inception of damage at critical areas.

The development of a long-term electrolyte gel would enable MATECH to test for cracks in bridges over the long-term, lasting months instead of days. MATECH would offer this enhanced EFS System as part of an overall long-term bridge monitoring system, many of which are being implemented across the country. Typically, these ongoing monitoring systems include video cameras, weight and temperature sensors, and other technologies to ensure vehicle safety and provide the bridge owner with extensive knowledge of bridge status.

This long-term system would open additional markets to MATECH with applications in the construction, shipping, petrochemical, nuclear, and aerospace industries, amongst others.

"We are always looking for ways to improve our revolutionary EFS technology to further broaden its appeal and open up new markets," said Robert Bernstein, CEO of MATECH. "The development of a long-term electrolyte gel will enable us to sell the EFS System as an essential addition to the long-term bridge monitoring systems currently in use across the country."

About MATECH

MATECH Corp., formerly Material Technologies, Inc., was founded in 1983 and is based in Los Angeles. It is an engineering, research and development company that specializes in technologies to measure microscopic fractures in metal structures and to monitor metal fatigue. The Company has completed significant work for the federal government -- generating $8.3 million to develop technology to detect metal fatigue in aircraft. It has also received $5 million in private investments. Building on that base, it is now marketing its technologies to companies and government agencies involved in the inspection of metal highway and railroad bridges. To learn more, go to www.matechcorp.com.

Forward-Looking Statements

Except for the historical information contained herein, the matters discussed in this press release are forward-looking statements. Such statements are indicated by words or phrases such as "believe," "will," "breakthrough," "significant," "indicated," "feel," "revolutionary," "should," "ideal," "extremely" and "excited." These statements are made under "Safe Harbor" provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Actual results may differ materially from those described in forward-looking statements and are subject to risks and uncertainties. See the Company's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission including, without limitation, the Company's recent Form 10-K and Form 10-Qs, which identify specific factors that may cause actual results or events to differ materially from those described in the forward-looking statements.