SOURCE: Dupuytren Foundation

Dupuytren Foundation

May 19, 2010 16:17 ET

Miami International Dupuytren Symposium Breaks New Ground

MIAMI, FL--(Marketwire - May 19, 2010) -  Medical researchers and physicians from 15 countries converge May 22 and 23 at the Intercontinental Hotel in Miami for an intensive two day summit on Dupuytren's Disease. Dupuytren's disease is a progressive condition which gradually curls the fingers permanently into the palm. It is estimated that 3 to 9 million Americans have bent fingers from Dupuytren's. Currently, there is no cure. The goals of this symposium are for experts to share new information and to organize for the first time an international coalition of doctors and scientists who will work together to develop better options for treating this crippling genetic disease. This is a major step toward finding a cure.

Dupuytren's Disease is a "silent" condition because it affects seniors, progresses slowly, and can escape notice by others until it is fairly advanced. It is common enough that many public figures have been afflicted, including Ronald Reagan, Margaret Thatcher, playwright Samuel Beckett, pianist Misha Dichter, actors Bill Nighy and David McCallum, as well as James Barrie, author of "Peter Pan," who is believed to have based Captain Hook's hand on his own. Progress in treating Dupuytren's has potential impact on the treatment of other life altering conditions such as pulmonary fibrosis, scleroderma, renal fibrosis and cirrhosis of the liver.

The 2010 International Symposium on Dupuytren's Disease is hosted by The Dupuytren Foundation, www.DupuytrenFoundation.org, a 501(c)(3) public charity established to promote research, education and global collaboration towards finding better treatment options for Dupuytren's and related conditions.

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