SOURCE: My Job Chart

My Job Chart

December 31, 2013 15:00 ET

MyJobChart.com: Let Your New Years Resolution Work for You Financially

Planning for a Financially Sound 2014 Is a Teachable Moment for Your Kids

SCOTTSDALE, AZ--(Marketwired - December 31, 2013) - Do you have any New Years Resolutions? According to a 2012 survey by University of Scranton, an estimated 190 million Americans make a yearly list of things to do or improve upon. If by chance, one of your items is to create a financial plan, live on a budget or get debt under control, then January is the perfect month for you to map a course to stronger financial stability.

January has been designated National Financial Wellness month in the U.S. and MyJobChart.com recommends making resolutions that are achievable for you but can also serve as teachable moments for your children. The average adult will make thousands of financial decisions during the next year, including many which will be made with kids watching or listening.

To help move your children in the right direction in 2014, Gregg Murset, CEO of MyJobChart.com and a Certified Financial Planner offer the following out of the box suggestions:

No More Hand Outs.
Start the year off right by deciding that you are not going to just shell out money to your kids anymore. When they come to looking for money, let them know that they will have to work for it. The bank is now closed unless they start pulling their weight a little more around the house. Tying work and reward together in some meaningful ways will help them understand responsibility and accountability. It will also help them understand that in real life, no one ever gets money for doing nothing.

Smash The Piggy Bank.
Piggy Banks are a bad way to teach kids about money. That's right, take that piggy bank and smash it or throw it away. Long gone are the days when we should be teaching our kids about money by dropping coins into a bank that looks like a pig, jar or favorite sport team mascot. Using banks like these only teach children about money in a manner that isn't as relevant anymore. Get them a real bank account and teach them how to manage their money though online services. It is far more useful to learn to manage money in a bank rather than a pig.

Make Kids Pay… For The Cell Phone, That Is.
According to Consumer Reports the average mobile phone user spends about $600 a year. If you do the math, you're going to be shocked at how much you are going to be spending over the years so that your kids can send hundreds of meaningless texts each month to their friends! Kids should pay some, or all of their phone bill each month. This is a perfect opportunity for you to sit down and teach your children about how much things cost, especially things that they seem to think they are entitled to for some reason. This is also a great time to discuss the things that they can do around the house to earn the money to help pay that bill.

Play The Match Game.
Set up a matching program for your kids. They save a dollar and you match that dollar. Yes, 100% return. Sit down and determine what they would like to save for and then set out to accomplish it together. This is a great opportunity to talk about short term, mid-term and long term goals. When a child learns the power of savings like this at an early age, what do you think will happen when they get their first job and they learn about the 401(k) program that is available?

Comic Books To Teach Kids About Money? Now That's Just Dumb.
Last year a credit card company teamed up with a leading comic book publisher to put together something to teach kids about personal banking practices. Talk about a square peg in a round hole. They supposedly were going to distribute 150,000 of these square pegs in eight different languages. Why does something as important as personal finance have to be jammed into little white blurbs above super heroes heads in a comic book? Parents should be fighting to get personal finance taught in our schools not forcing the subject where it doesn't really fit.

Make Them Better Givers.
No matter how your children earn their money, make sure they plan to donate a portion of it to a charity of their choice. The average American gives away about 4% of their annual income to charity and perhaps that percentage would increase if the next generation made giving a common practice as soon as they learned how to share with important causes. 

Set Goals That Are Meaningful.
A start of a new year is a great time to sit down with children and talk goals. Meaningful goals. Help your children put together a plan on working toward and saving for something significant. It could be a bike, musical instrument, laptop computer or a future college degree. The more meaningful the goal, the harder our kids will work to accomplish it.

About MyJobChart.com
MyJobChart.com, based in Scottsdale, Arizona, is a free, easy to use, online and mobile job chart and reward system designed to teach, organize and motivate kids to earn, save, share and spend responsibly. Bringing together the latest technology and basic personal finance principles to help parents teach their children responsibility, accountability and how to manage money wisely. Over the past two years, My Job Chart now has over 565,000 members, with kids having completed over 19.5 million jobs and earned nearly $3 million. MyJobChart.com can also be used through its Apple and Android mobile apps, allowing parents and kids the opportunity to save, share and spend from anywhere. For more information, visit www.myjobchart.com.

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Contact Information

  • Mike Prusinski
    VP of Marketing Communications
    My Job Chart
    888-907-7121 (O)