SOURCE: Cummins

Cummins

May 10, 2017 08:00 ET

New Cummins QuietConnect Home Standby Generators Available in Time for Hurricane Season

Cummins Home Standby Generators Provide Instant Peace-of-Mind when the Power Goes Out

MINNEAPOLIS, MN--(Marketwired - May 10, 2017) - Cummins, a global leader in back-up power solutions and engine technology, introduces the new QuietConnect series of home standby generators in time for homeowners to prepare for hurricane season. Hurricanes are notorious for leaving people without power -- Hurricane Matthew alone left more than 600,000 homes in the dark1. With the right standby generator, homeowners can be assured that the power in their homes will be restored immediately when there is an outage.

With Hurricane Preparedness Week already in progress, now is the time to start preparing for potential damage from storms. Meteorologist Cheryl Nelson, a Weather and Preparedness Advisor for Cummins, recommends the following to ensure that residents and their homes remain secure:

  • Keep important supplies, including prescriptions, bottled water, non-perishable food and a first aid kit, at home, at work and in your vehicle.
  • Create a communications plan with information on how to contact family in an emergency, as well as an out-of-town contact.
  • Store important documents in a metal strongbox to protect them from the elements, and keep copies on a portable flash drive.
  • Survey property for items that may need repair. Check signs or shutters, walkways, storage spaces and even overgrown vegetation. Check for loose or hanging shingles and roof leaks. Clean out gutters and chimneys.
  • Develop a long-term plan that covers a few weeks and includes back-up power generation. A standby generator restores power automatically, even when no one is home.
  • Test home standby generator in preparation for upcoming storms to ensure it is working properly and turns on automatically when the power goes out.

Cummins has been developing ground-breaking products for nearly 100 years. The Company's rigorous testing and innovative engineering have led to the development of the QuietConnect line of standby generators, which deliver dependable and powerful performance, neighbor-friendly sound levels, a compact design enabling installation as close as 18 inches from the home, as well as enhanced energy efficiency. Patented sound technology, coupled with an advanced housing design, make the QuietConnect Series among the quietest running generators available on the market today. Cummins standby generators -- unlike portable generators that can be noisy, require manual set-up, running cords and gasoline -- turn on automatically, and power the things you specify, the moment an outage occurs. 

Cummins Connect Series™ standby generators can be purchased and installed by an authorized Cummins dealer or purchased separately and installed by a qualified electrical contractor. For more information about Cummins standby generators or to estimate your power needs, visit https://homegenerators.cummins.com/ or call 1-800-CUMMINS to schedule a free in-home assessment.

About Cummins Inc.
Cummins Inc., a global power leader, is a corporation of complementary business units that design, manufacture, distribute and service diesel and natural gas engines and related technologies, including fuel systems, controls, air handling, filtration, emission solutions and electrical power generation systems. Headquartered in Columbus, Indiana, (USA) Cummins currently employs approximately 55,400 people worldwide and serves customers in approximately 190 countries and territories through a network of approximately 600 company-owned and independent distributor locations and approximately 7,400 dealer locations. Cummins earned $1.39 billion on sales of $17.5 billion in 2016. Press releases can be found on the Web at www.cummins.com. Follow Cummins on Twitter at www.twitter.com/cummins and on YouTube at www.youtube.com/cumminsinc.

1Nunez, M. (2016. October). One Dead, Over 600,000 Without Power as Hurricane Matthew Pummels East Coast. Retrieved from http://gizmodo.com/1-d