Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters

Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters
O.P.P.

O.P.P.

October 15, 2013 09:21 ET

OFAH Media Release: Driving in Deer Country

Watch, Brake and Stop

PETERBOROUGH, ONTARIO--(Marketwired - Oct. 15, 2013) - Every fall there is an increase of wildlife activity on Ontario's roadways that results in thousands of vehicle collisions with wild animals.

According to the Ontario Ministry of Transportation website, "Wild animals are unpredictable at all times. However, there are two peak times when the risk of a collision is highest: May and June when animals seek road salt in ditches and try to escape biting insects and October to January during the fall mating and migration seasons." The site also states that on average in Ontario, there is a collision every 38 minutes.

"Vehicle/wildlife collisions are higher in Ontario during the fall months because the breeding period is on, so animals are on the move and mating," said OFAH Provincial Manager of Fish & Wildlife Services, Dr. Terry Quinney. "Hunting, which is strictly regulated by the Ministry of Natural Resources, helps reduce the number of vehicle collisions caused by certain species, such as deer, moose and bear by reducing the density of big game animals."

"There are some important driving tips to keep in mind when travelling through areas known for wildlife activity," said Constable Bruce Hanna of Peterborough County OPP. "Be especially attentive at dusk and dawn. Deer are more active at this time and more difficult to see. Scan both ditches as you drive. Deer are powerful jumpers that can appear on the roadway with little or no warning. Slow down and keep your vehicle speed at or below the posted speed limit and, most importantly, concentrate on your driving. Do not allow distractions to interfere with your focus."

The Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters is Ontario's largest, nonprofit, fish and wildlife conservation-based organization, representing 100,000 members, subscribers and supporters, and 710 member clubs. To learn more, visit www.ofah.org.

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