SOURCE: Prolacta Bioscience, Inc.

Prolacta Bioscience, Inc.

August 12, 2015 09:51 ET

Prolacta Bioscience Applauds Worldwide Support for Breastfeeding and Use of Human Milk for Pre-Term Infants

More Than 17 International Organizations Have Issued Policies and Recommendations on the Role of Breastfeeding and Benefits of Breast Milk

CITY OF INDUSTRY, CA--(Marketwired - August 12, 2015) - In recognition of Breastfeeding Awareness Month, Prolacta Bioscience®, the pioneer in human milk-based neonatal nutritional products, applauds the growing number of international policies and organizations that support breastfeeding and the use of human milk in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) worldwide.

More than 17 organizations globally have recognized the benefits of breastfeeding:

  • The World Health Organization (WHO)(i)
  • United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)(i)
  • Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI)(ii)
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)(iii)
  • American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)(iv)
  • Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN)(v)
  • Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCOAH)(vi)
  • American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG)(vii)
  • National Association of Neonatal Nurses (NANN)(viii)
  • The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine (ABM)(ix)
  • Health People 2020 Department of Health and Human Services(x)
  • Office of the United States Surgeon General(xi)
  • American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP)(xii)
  • American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM)(xiii)
  • Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics(xiv)
  • American Academy of Nursing (AAN)(xv)
  • United States Breastfeeding Committee (USBC)(xvi)

WHO and UNICEF were the first, in 1990, to declare that, "as a global goal for optimal maternal and child health and nutrition, all women should be enabled to practice exclusive breastfeeding and all infants should be fed exclusively on breast milk from birth to four-to-six months of age."(xvii)

Since then, several organizations have expanded recommendations to premature and critically ill infants in the NICU. The AAP, which has long supported breastfeeding, added to their 2012 recommendations that, "if mother's own milk is unavailable … pasteurized donor milk should be used" and should be "fortified for the infant born weighing less than 1.5 kg."(xviii)

Just this year, the AWHONN recommended, "because the feeding of human milk to preterm and vulnerable newborns provides health and nutritional benefits, it should be promoted, supported, and protected as the ideal and normative method for feeding preterm and vulnerable newborns."(xix) Furthermore, NANN takes the position that the "use of human milk and breastfeeding are essential components in providing optimal health for the critically ill newborn."(xx)

Growing scientific evidence supports the health benefits of an exclusive human milk diet for premature infants in the NICU, as opposed to cow milk-based nutrition or formula. A report published in 2014 in the journal Breastfeeding Medicine found an increase in the likelihood of developing necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), NEC requiring surgery, or sepsis, as the amount of cow milk-based protein fed to the infants in the control group increased(xxi). NEC is one of the leading causes of mortality among preterm babies.

"International recognition and support for breastfeeding and the use of human milk reflects the growing body of scientific research on the benefits of breast milk for premature infants," said Scott Elster, president and CEO of Prolacta Bioscience.

In September 2015, leading international experts will meet in Pasadena, Calif., for the 3rdInternational Conference on Human Milk Science and Innovation to discuss the latest discoveries, scientific advances and clinical research related to human milk. Renowned speakers will present on the biological, clinical and applied aspects of human milk and its use in neonatal intensive care. The conference is sponsored by Prolacta. For additional information, visit: http://humanmilkscience.org/.

About Prolacta Bioscience
Prolacta Bioscience, Inc. is a privately-held life sciences company dedicated to Advancing the Science of Human Milk®. The company pioneered the development of human milk-based Neonatal Nutritional Products to meet the needs of critically ill, premature infants in the NICU. Prolacta leads the industry in the quality and safety of nutritional products made from breast milk and operates the first and only pharmaceutical-grade manufacturing facility for the processing of human breast milk. For more information please visit www.prolacta.com.

(i) United Nations Children's Fund, "Innocenti Declaration on the Protection, Promotion and Support of Breastfeeding." August 1990. http://www.unicef.org/nutrition/index_24807.html

(ii) Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative, "The Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding, Protecting, Promoting and Supporting Breast-feeding: The Special Role of Maternity Services. Geneva: WHO, 1989.http://www.babyfriendlyusa.org/about-us/baby-friendly-hospital-initiative

(iii) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention., "Strategies to Prevent Obesity and Other Chronic Diseases. The CDC Guide to Strategies to Support Breastfeeding Mothers and Babies.". U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; 2013

(iv) American Academy of Pediatrics, "Breastfeeding and the Use of Human Milk." Pediatrics. 2012;129:e827

(v) Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. "Breastfeeding," Journal of Gynecological & Neonatal Nursing; 2015: (44)1: 145-150.

(vi) The Joint Commission, "Questions and Answers: The Perinatal Care Core Measure Set." Joint Commission Perspectives, 2013; (33)11: 12-14

(vii) American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, "Breastfeeding: Maternal and Infant Aspects." Obstetrics & Gynecology, February 2007.

(viii) National Association of Neonatal Nurses. "The Use of Human Milk and Breastfeeding in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit." February 2009. http://www.nann.org/pdf/09nicu_milk.pdf

(ix) Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, "Position on Breastfeeding." Breastfeeding Medicine. 2008; 3(4): 267-270.

(x) Healthy People 2020. "Maternal, Infant, and Child Health." https://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/topics-objectives/topic/maternal-infant-and-child-health/objectives

(xi) U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Surgeon General, "Executive Summary: The Surgeon Genera's Call to Action to Support Breastfeeding. January 2011. http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/calls/breastfeeding/executivesummary.pdf

(xii) American Academy of Family Physicians, "Breastfeeding, Family Physicians Supporting (Position Paper)." 2014. http://www.aafp.org/about/policies/all/breastfeeding-support.html

(xiii) American College of Nurse-Midwives, "Position Statement." 2011. http://www.midwife.org/ACNM/files/ACNMLibraryData/UPLOADFILENAME/000000000248/Breastfeeding%20statement%20May%202011.pdf

(xiv) Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, "Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Promoting and Supporting Breastfeeding." Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 2015; (115)3; 444-449

(xv) American Academy of Nursing, "Fellows Lead American Academy of Nursing at Surgeon General's 'Call to Action to Support Breastfeeding.'" January 2011. http://www.aannet.org/pr-12511-fellows-call-to-action-breastfeeding

(xvi) United States Breastfeeding Committee, "Safe Use of Donor Human Milk." 2008. http://www.usbreastfeeding.org/p/cm/ld/fid=22

(xvii) United Nations Children's Fund, "Innocenti Declaration on the Protection, Promotion and Support of Breastfeeding." August 1990. http://www.unicef.org/nutrition/index_24807.html

(xviii) American Academy of Pediatrics, "Breastfeeding and the Use of Human Milk." Pediatrics. 2012;129:e827

(xix) Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. "Breastfeeding," Journal of Gynecological & Neonatal Nursing; 2015: (44)1: 145-150.

(xx) National Association of Neonatal Nurses. "The Use of Human Milk and Breastfeeding in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit." February 2009. http://www.nann.org/pdf/09nicu_milk.pdf

(xxi) Abrams S, et al., "Greater Mortality and Morbidity in Extremely Preterm Infants Fed a Diet Containing Cow Milk Protein Products." Breastfeeding Medicine. 2014;9(6):281-285

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