SOURCE: National Milk Mustache 'got milk?' Campaign

November 21, 2013 05:00 ET

Pump Up Your Morning With Protein at Breakfast

MISSION, KS--(Marketwired - Nov 21, 2013) - (Family Features) We all know breakfast is the most important meal of the day, but what's the key to making the most out of the morning meal? It could be protein. From building strong muscles to keeping bones healthy, there's good reason to include protein in your morning meal.

Breakfast is typically lower in protein than other meals, but it's a particularly important time to include protein in your diet. The average breakfast only has 10-12 grams of protein -- far from the 20-30 grams per meal that's recommended.(1,2) One easy way to help close the gap is to include an 8-ounce glass of milk. Whether lowfat or fat free, milk is a breakfast powerhouse, packed with nine essential nutrients, including eight grams of high-quality protein to help start your day off right.

What's more, not all protein sources are created equal. Milk protein is a complete protein, while most plant proteins may be missing some of the building blocks your body needs. Including milk at breakfast can help you be sure you're meeting the recommended amount of protein and milk each day.

For more breakfast tips and recipes, visit http://thebreakfastproject.com/. Also, follow the Milk Mustache Campaign on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/MilkMustache, and Twitter @MilkMustache.

Hearty Oatmeal with Strawberries, Dried Cherries and Almonds

Oatmeal is a classic favorite, and paired with dried cherries, almonds and cinnamon, this recipe invokes the aromas and flavors of the holidays. Add 1/2 a banana and glass of milk to round out your plate for a breakfast with 25 grams of protein.

Makes: 2 servings

1 3/4   cup lowfat or fat free milk
1   cup old-fashioned or quick cooking oats (not instant)
1   teaspoon brown sugar
1/8   teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4   cup sliced strawberries
1/4   cup dried cherries
3   tablespoons toasted sliced almonds (3/4 ounce)

Combine milk, oatmeal, brown sugar, and cinnamon in saucepan; bring to a boil over medium-high heat, stirring often to prevent boiling over. Cook until thickened; divide between two serving bowls and top with strawberries, cherries, and almonds; serve immediately.

(1) What We Eat in America, NHANES 2009-2010, individuals 2 years and over.
(2) Layman DK. Dietary Guidelines should reflect new understandings about adult protein needs. Nutr & Metab. 2009;6:12.

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