SOURCE: Monaghan Medical Corporation

Monaghan

SOURCE: Trudell Medical

Trudell Medical

May 12, 2016 08:45 ET

Research Study Reveals Significant Improvements in Quality of Life for People With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

LONDON, ON--(Marketwired - May 12, 2016) - A recent study by Western University researchers, published in the Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, reveals that the use of the Aerobika® device, has a significant impact on quality of life for study patients suffering from chronic bronchitis, a disease that accounts for almost 70% of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) diagnoses globally.[1] These study results show significant promise for millions of people suffering from COPD worldwide.

COPD is the 4th leading cause of death in North America, accounting for 29% of hospitalizations[2] and 1.5 million physician visits each year[3]. Those affected struggle to breathe, experience frequent hospitalization and face the risk of premature death. COPD also causes a high economic burden, with costs to the North American healthcare system estimated in the billions. Until now, there has been no significant nonpharmacological method to treat COPD patients with Chronic Bronchitis.

The Aerobika* device was evaluated in patients with a clinical diagnosis of COPD, conducted at The Robarts Research Institute, affiliated with the Schulich School of Medicine, Western University, London Canada. The findings indicated that for those sputum producing patients, daily use of the Aerobika* device for three to four weeks produced significant improvements in clinical and patient reported outcomes. These included improved lung capacity, improved ease in mucus clearance, increased exercise tolerance and improvement in quality of life -- significant results for COPD researchers and patients.

"Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) patients with chronic sputum production have worse clinical outcomes and accelerated lung function decline. Currently, there are few therapies available to support these patients and the results of this study are promising. After three or four weeks of using the Aerobika* device daily, for COPD patients with chronic sputum production there was an improvement in how easily sputum could be coughed up and an improvement in quality-of-life," says Dr. Sarah Svenningsen, lead author on The Robarts Research Institute study.

"Patients suffering from COPD now have a safe and easy-to-use method to address the unmet need of mucus clearance, which can potentially reduce the need for hospitalization," says Dominic Coppolo , Vice President of Clinical Affairs at Monaghan Medical Corporation. "Since its introduction to the market, the Aerobika* device has already achieved a high degree of acceptance within the COPD patient population in the US."

Dr. Jason Suggett, Group Director Science & Technology for Trudell Medical International concurs. "This research addresses a real and pressing concern in the treatment of COPD. Patients often take multiple medications for various conditions and medication adherence can be low. The Robarts Research Institute team's study is an important validation of the positive patient outcomes experienced through this novel drug-free treatment."

Additional quality of life evidence will be presented at the American Thoracic Society Conference in San Francisco on May 18, 2016.

About The Aerobika* Device

The Aerobika* device is hand-held, easy-to-use, and drug-free. When the patient exhales through the device, intermittent resistance creates positive pressure and oscillations simultaneously, which stents open the airways, mobilizes and assists in moving mucus to the upper airways where it can be coughed out. This may also aid in improved drug deposition. The Aerobika* device is available in Canada, Mexico, and select European countries including the UK and Germany through TMI and in the US via Monaghan Medical Corporation. https://www.trudellmed.com/products/aerobika

About Trudell Medical International (TMI)

TMI designs, develops and manufactures a wide range of medical devices and is home to the world-renowned Trudell Medical Aerosol Institute. From the flagship AeroChamber* Brand of Valved Holding Chamber (VHC) and the latest award-winning Aerobika* device, to custom designed products and systems, our best-in-class respiratory management products are sold in over 110 countries. Their efficacy has been validated in hundreds of peer-reviewed articles from various medical journals. https://www.trudellmed.com/

About Monaghan Medical Corporation (MMC, USA)

MMC, an affiliate of TMI, offers leading aerosol drug delivery devices and respiratory management products including AeroEclipse* II BAN, AeroChamber* Plus* brand aVHC, and the Aerobika* device exclusively in the United States. Our strength lies in product development around core capabilities in mechanical design complimented by collaboration with a state-of-the-art aerosol research laboratory. We focus on developing cost-efficient, outcome-based solutions for our customers. http://www.monaghanmed.com/

About The Robarts Research Institute

Opened in 1986, Robarts Research Institute at Western University is a medical research facility in London, Ontario, with more than 600 people working to investigate some of the most debilitating diseases of our time, from heart disease and stroke to diabetes, Alzheimer's and many forms of cancer. http://www.robarts.ca/

Social media and additional links

Twitter 
@AerobikaOPEP

@TrudellMed

@MonaghanMedical

YouTube 
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFkCOz_WZ8TcVs4sBC4P8qA

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHIPAhxCCD6VDrKVvxdzWsQ

Facebook 
https://www.facebook.com/trudellmedical

[1] American Lung Association. Trends in COPD (Chronic Bronchitis and Emphysema): Morbidity and Mortality. March 2013

[2] Centre for chronic disease prevention and control. Editorial board for respiratory disease in Canada, Health Canada, Ottawa, Canada, 2001

[3] Balter MS et al. Canadian Guidelines for the management of acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis: Executive summary. Can Respir J 2003;10(5):248-258.

Embedded Video Available: https://youtu.be/n7X3QP8HJKA

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