SOURCE: Bosch Rexroth Corporation

Bosch Rexroth Corporation

February 24, 2009 16:05 ET

Rexroth Audio Case History: Helping Make Cellophane House Homebuilding Concept a Reality

New Podcast Episode From Bosch Rexroth Discusses How Its Aluminum Structural Framing, Commonly Used in Factory Applications, Entered a New Arena When Architectural Firm KieranTimberlake Made the Product a Key Element in a Unique, Sustainable Version of the Family Home

BUCHANAN, MI--(Marketwire - February 24, 2009) - Bosch Rexroth (www.boschrexroth-us.com/lean) has released a new lean manufacturing audio case history discussing how architectural innovators, KieranTimberlake (Philadelphia, PA - www.kierantimberlake.com), used Rexroth's Aluminum Structural Framing to complete a unique design project that incorporated innovative thinking, waste reduction and design-for-reuse principles into a very commonplace creation: the family home.

Rexroth's Aluminum Structural Framing -- and a number of lean manufacturing concepts -- found new application in the design of Cellophane House, a 5-story prefabricated dwelling. Cellophane House was erected on the property of The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York as part of the Home Delivery: Fabricating the Modern Dwelling exhibit, which explored both the historic and contemporary significance of factory-produced architecture from 1833 to today. Cellophane House offered a new look at how aluminum framing can be used in architectural construction -- and at how its capabilities can help create sustainable housing.

"We aimed to create a mass customizable system of building, not just a one-off," said James Timberlake, a founding partner at KieranTimberlake. "We wanted to show how an industrial approach could bring process optimization benefits to the home building process -- almost like 'lean' home building."

Cellophane House is also "designed for disassembly," according to Timberlake, meaning it can be taken apart and the materials retain their integrity. Therefore, the house is easily assembled, modified, disassembled, and reassembled. After being disassembled, the aluminum framing can be reused or recycled. Cellophane House demonstrates how modern technologies and lean concepts can make a traditional process more efficient, sustainable, and environmentally friendly.

"Cellophane House Part I and II" is episode number nine in Rexroth's lean manufacturing podcast series, available for listening or free download from the company's website at www.boschrexroth-us.com/leanpodcast. The podcast series is also available from the iTunes podcast library and other podcast directories.

Developed by Bosch Rexroth's Linear Motion and Assembly Technologies group, each eight-to-fifteen minute lean manufacturing podcast episode presents guest experts and information to help manufacturers and OEMs understand and apply lean principles and practices in their businesses.

Contact Information

  • Editorial Inquiries:
    Todd Walter
    Godfrey
    717-393-383 ext 133
    twalter@godfrey.com

    Kevin Gingerich
    Bosch Rexroth Corporation
    Linear Motion and Assembly Technologies
    816 East Third Street
    Buchanan, MI 49107
    Telephone 269-697-5295
    Fax 269-695-5363
    kevin.gingerich@boschrexroth-us.com