SOURCE: Sidecut Reports

April 30, 2008 08:00 ET

Sprint, Wimax Have 2008 to 'Xohm Or Go Home,' Says Inaugural Research Report From Sidecut Reports

In-Depth Look at the State of WiMax Wireless Broadband Deployments in the U.S. Gives Business Professionals, Investors and Entrepreneurs Decision-Influencing Analysis That Goes Far Beyond Blogs for Far Less Than Analyst Offerings

BURLINGAME, CA--(Marketwire - April 30, 2008) - A mature technology, a growing product ecosystem and economic opportunity based on a growing demand for mobile Internet access make 2008 a potential breakout year in the U.S. for the wireless broadband technology known as WiMax, according to a report from Sidecut Reports (www.sidecutreports.com), a new independent editorial research firm. But the report also notes that the window of opportunity is closing rapidly, making it imperitive for Sprint, Intel and their rumored gang of WiMax allies to launch services this year before competitive technologies can come to market.

Titled "Xohm Or Go Home: Why 2008 Is WiMax's Breakout Year in the U.S. -- Or Else!," the inaugural report is the first of Sidecut Reports' planned list of in-depth looks into topics at the intersection of telecommunications, the Internet and public policy. Led by longtime industry journalist Paul Kapustka, Sidecut Reports represents the future of technology journalism, providing business professionals in a wide range of disciplines with deep background, up-to-the minute information, and decision-making analysis on pertinent topics that goes far beyond blogs at a price far less than that charged by traditional analyst operations.

The WiMax report is based on several months of reporting, including in-person interviews at the most recent industry trade shows, as well as direct interviews with companies and executives from the product manufacturers and service providers in the WiMax arena. The end result is an editorially independent report that provides the reader with an in-depth look at the most current state of the WiMax market in the U.S., and how it might create business opportunities for enterprises, investors and entrepreneurs in markets including mobile Internet businesses, software development, and mobile device manufacturing.

The report begins with the latest news on the planned launch of Sprint's "Xohm" WiMax network and then adds in a technical backgrounder on WiMax itself before exploring the technical and business reasons behind WiMax's opportunities and challenges, concluding with several predictions for WiMax's fate in 2008. Prepared in an easy-to-read style accessible to those who may not have completely understood WiMax before, the report is also free of any vendor influence, making it much different than analyst reports that may have been tailored to suit sponsor interests, or may be too deep in technical minutae to be understood by a wider audience.

"Since Intel and others have been beating WiMax's drum loudly for several years now, mainstream media and most of the technical press are starting to wonder when, or if, the technology will ever live up to the hype," said Kapustka, who was managing editor at the GigaOM blog network before starting Sidecut Reports late last year. At the recent CTIA show in Las Vegas, Sprint's announcement that the Xohm launch would be delayed led to many headlines predicting the technology's early demise, a jump to conclusions that Kapustka said is inevitable for those who don't spend the time necessary to look deeper and wider at the bigger WiMax world.

"While the Sprint launch is the most high-profile WiMax operation around, there are more parts to the story, including the potential rise of CLEC-type providers using WiMax to circumvent the local copper loop," Kapustka said. "There is also a huge market developing for WiMax in emerging countries, which could provide profits for U.S. gear makers or application developers, and eventually their investors. Even Sprint's big partners, including Motorola, say that Xohm is only a small part of their WiMax plans for 2008. So to write WiMax off because of Sprint's problems is to miss the bigger story."

Pricing for the WiMax Sidecut Report is $149.95, which entitles readers to a year's worth of news flashes and report updates in the Wireless Broadband category of coverage. Sidecut Reports plans to offer three more reports in this calendar year, in the coverage catetgory areas of Public Policy, Internet Video Infrastructure, and Advanced Telephony. The next scheduled report is on the topic of "Network Neutrality." Full-site yearly subscriptions are also available, as are subscription discounts for students and professionals at non-profit organizations. While individuals can purchase and download reports directly from the Sidecut Reports website (www.sidecutreports.com), other sales inquires should be directed to sales@sidecutreports.com.

ABOUT SIDECUT REPORTS

Sidecut Reports, a new independent editorial research firm, represents the future of technology journalism, providing business professionals in a wide range of disciplines with deep background, up-to-the minute information, and decision-making analysis on pertinent topics that goes far beyond blogs at a price far less than that charged by traditional analyst operations. Led by longtime industry journalist Paul Kapustka, Sidecut Reports provides in-depth looks into topics at the intersection of telecommunications, the Internet and public policy, which are available for purchase online at www.sidecutreports.com.

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