SOURCE: Fuel Doctor

December 10, 2010 16:53 ET

Statement From FUEL DOCTOR in Response to Consumer Reports Review of FD-47

Fuel Doctor Issues Challenge to Consumer Reports; Review Our Product -- the Way It Was Designed for Use; Engineered for 12 Volt Systems Using Gas-Diesel-LPG Fuel on Vehicles 2 Years or Older, Consumer Reports Tests FD-47 on Newer Cars to Come Out With a Flawed Review

LOS ANGELES, CA--(Marketwire - December 10, 2010) - Can an automobile product -- simple to use and inexpensive to purchase -- help older vehicles to improve their performance through power conditioning?

The management and engineering staff behind the Fuel Doctor's FD-47 have worked hard to assure the development of a product that delivers on its claims, and has invested substantial resources to assure its effectiveness by commissioning several independent tests with the industry's most renowned automotive research organizations in the U.S. and abroad.

As recent as October 2010, the FD-47 was tested at Intertek, among the largest and most respected testing agencies in the world, at the request of a leading aftermarket automotive retailer which requires product validation and testing before they purchase. The results of Intertek's detailed research are published on our website. 

In addition to Intertek's factual findings as well as findings from the other major test centers (whose test results are also on our Website), tens of thousands of satisfied customers attest to the fact that FD-47 yields measurable fuel consumption improvement in older vehicles in addition to other benefits from power conditioning of the vehicles electrical system.

Consumer Reports reviews FD-47 in its January 2011 issue as well as a separate video review posted on YouTube. The Consumer Reports findings conclude that our product is a 'don't buy' with a performance problem.

Measuring the effectiveness of the FD-47 with new vehicles and possibly a hybrid -- we can see why.

Our product is not designed for either new vehicles or hybrids.

Fuel Doctor is disappointed -- even shocked -- that Consumer Reports, a trusted name for decades in protecting consumers against products that do not live up to their claims as well as a reliable resource for products that deliver according to claims -- has proceeded to put out a review without putting our product to test in accordance with clearly stated instructions boldly displayed on the outside package. 

Simply stated, the FD-47 does indeed work -- when the product is tested against the protocols for which it was designed. As cited above, four major independent automotive research organizations -- including a major national automotive retailer that tests ALL of its products -- validated the FD-47's effectiveness and share a common conclusion: The FD-47 measurably reduces fuel consumption in the vehicles tested two years and older.

Consumer Reports put our product to the test -- but their test was conducted against our product protocols and basic directions to ensure proper results.

Consumer Reports says: "...Fuel Doctors says it works best on cars two years or older but positive effects can be expected on newer vehicles as well."

This is a fabricated statement taken out of context and nowhere on the outside of our packaging do we suggest this. 

Consumer Reports proceeds to utilize this fabricated statement as the basis for their review of the FD-47.

  • CR tested the FD-47 primarily on new vehicles rather than on vehicles two years or older which is the entire thrust of the product.
  • Our instructions recommend that motorists allow FD-47 to properly adapt to the vehicle's specific electronic control unit (ECU) by running through at two to three tanks of fuel. It appears from the CR YouTube video that CR did not give the test cars the required miles before calculating effectiveness on fuel decrease. 
  • CR asks if the system is so effective, "why didn't Ford or GM think of that?" Quite simply, they're in the business of manufacturing and selling new cars -- we're in the business of keeping older cars running at their peak efficiency by power conditioning.

Fuel Doctor USA challenges Consumer Reports to put our product to a real driving test. CR lost all credibility for testing the FD-47 when its evaluation was based on its own incorrect interpretation of our packaging. Their FD-47 review makes us wonder -- how many times has CR offered up its conclusions (negative or positive) based on tests that -- on their face -- are inappropriately designed? As we have clearly and unimpeachably demonstrated above, CR did not follow even the most fundamental directives clearly outlined on our packaging and advertising. 

We therefore issue this challenge to CR: Fuel Doctor will arrange a NASCAR -sanctioned track or road course to utilize for the purpose of testing the FD-47 on at least 6 vehicles that are 2 years old and older. No new cars. No hybrids. 65 miles per hour and 150 miles for each vehicle without the FD-47 and 150 miles with the FD-47 plugged in. And no instant measuring of fuel consumption reduction without the product being engaged throughout at least one full tank of gas cycle. The vehicles will be random and borrowed from a nearby used car lot that will be mutually agreed upon. All cars will have cruise control. We will stand by the results of those findings.

By accepting our challenge we believe CR will underscore its commitment to truth and accuracy and, of course, have the opportunity to determine the efficacy of our product in accordance to the product's instructions.

Contact Information

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