THE ARTHRITIS SOCIETY

THE ARTHRITIS SOCIETY

March 15, 2005 17:21 ET

THE ARTHRITIS SOCIETY AND MERCK FROSST CONGRATULATE AMY COTTON

In 2005, Merck Frosst helped the Canadian judo athlete with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis pursue her long-term dream Attention: Assignment Editor, Education Editor, Health/Medical Editor, Media Editor, Sports Editor MONTREAL--(CCNMatthews - March 15, 2005) - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

THE ARTHRITIS SOCIETY AND MERCK FROSST CONGRATULATE AMY COTTON ON SILVER MEDAL AT JUDO WORLD CUP

In 2005, Merck Frosst helped the Canadian judo athlete with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis pursue her long-term dream

MONTREAL, Quebec - March 15, 2005 - The Arthritis Society and Merck Frosst Canada Ltd. wish to congratulate Canadian judo athlete Amy Cotton on winning the silver medal in the under 78 kg event at the Judo World Cup in Prague, Czech Republic.

Amy, diagnosed with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), is one of the country's most promising judo champions. As a member of the 2004 Olympic Judo team, she represented Canada in Athens, Greece. Merck Frosst helped Amy pursue her long-term dream with the support of $10,000 to help her continue her training in 2005.

The Arthritis Society - Quebec Division is proud to announce that Amy will participate in the Camp for children with juvenile arthritis this August. Amy will speak to the children about the importance of believing in themselves and remaining active. The seven-day camp will welcome forty children and adolescents between the ages of 8 and 16 living with arthritis; they will be offered a week of activities including skilled supervision and adapted leisure activities, in a secure and appropriate environment. The camp is scheduled for August 14 to 20, 2005 at Camp Papillon, located in Saint-Alphonse-Rodriguez, Quebec.

Chronic childhood arthritis, sometimes referred to as juvenile rheumatoid arthritis or juvenile chronic arthritis is quite different from adult rheumatoid arthritis. In fact, many people have dropped the word "rheumatoid" and now refer to juvenile arthritis, or JA. JA is defined as continuous inflammation of one or more joints lasting at least six weeks for which no other cause can be found.

No one knows for sure what causes JA. We do know that it usually does not run in families, and arthritis is almost never passed from a parent to a child. Therefore, the chances of your child passing arthritis on to his/her children would be extremely rare. JA is not caused by eating the wrong foods, nor is there any proof that the patient's condition can be improved by specific diets.

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In Canada, there are some 6,000 children with juvenile arthritis and in Quebec, about 1500. It can occur in boys or girls of any age, but most commonly begins during the toddler or early teenage years. Girls are more affected than boys.

The Arthritis Society is the only non-profit organisation dedicated to providing and promoting arthritis education, community support and research-based solutions. Since its inception in 1949, The Society has invested more than $120 million towards arthritis research to develop better treatments for arthritis and, ultimately, to find a cure.

The Society is also committed to providing diversified programs to help those living with this disabling disease. In Quebec, one million people are living with arthritis, making it the most common chronic condition.

For more information on the programs and services offered by The Arthritis Society, call toll-free 1.800.321.1433 or visit www.arthritis.ca/quebec.

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FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT:

Danièle Rhéaume
Director, Communications
The Arthritis Society - Quebec Division
514-846-8840, ext. 229
IN: EDUCATION, HEALTH, MEDIA, SPORTS

Contact Information

  • Danièle Rhéaume, Director, Communications, The Arthritis Society
    Primary Phone: 514-846-8840 ext. 229
    Secondary Phone: 514-846-8840 ext. 235
    Toll-Free: 800-321-1433
    E-mail: drheaume@qc.arthritis.ca