CANADIAN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AGENCY - CIDA

CANADIAN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AGENCY - CIDA

April 17, 2009 12:45 ET

University of Saskatchewan to Train Health Care Workers in Mozambique

SASKATOON, SASKATCHEWAN--(Marketwire - April 17, 2009) - The Government of Canada today announced additional funding to support the University of Saskatchewan's partnership with Massinga Health Training Centre in Mozambique. The initiative will help improve the quality of health care in Mozambique by improving the skills of health workers and by increasing the number of health workers trained at the Massinga Centre, a health-training centre founded by the Mozambican Ministry of Health in collaboration with the University of Saskatchewan.

"By taking advantage of our experience and expertise in health care, Canada is well positioned to improve the skills of health workers in countries like Mozambique," said Minister Oda. "Canada will continue to play a key role in ensuring a better future for citizens in Africa."

"Canada is committed to being a leader in global health initiatives that are contributing to saving lives in countries like Mozambique," said MP Brad Trost (Saskatoon-Humboldt), on behalf of the Honourable Beverley J. Oda, Minister of International Cooperation. "For developing countries to succeed, they need skilled workers, and, in particular in the case of Mozambique, skilled health workers who are able to bridge the gap between communities and the national health system."

During her recent trip to Mozambique to review projects funded by the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), Minister Oda visited the Massinga Health Training Centre in Mozambique.

"The Massinga Centre has been recognized by Mozambique's Ministry of Health as a unique and innovative model for health training. I am very pleased that the curriculum used at the Centre will help the Ministry of Health revise its national health worker training curriculum," added MP Trost.

This new initiative builds on a strong history of results with the University of Saskatchewan. Over 800 students have already graduated from the Massinga Centre from continuing education courses or received training in preventive medicine.

"The goal of this five-year project is to triple the training capacity of the centre and to share its innovative community-based methods with other training centres in Mozambique," said Peter MacKinnon, President of the University of Saskatchewan.


BACKGROUNDER

GOVERNMENT OF CANADA ANNOUNCES FUNDING TO HELP TRAIN HEALTH WORKERS IN MOZAMBIQUE

The Community-based Health Training and Practice Program

$8.2 million (2009-2014)

The Community-based Health Training and Practice Program will help improve the quality of health care in Mozambique by improving the skills of health workers and by increasing the number of health workers trained at Mozambique's Massinga Centre, a health training centre founded by the Mozambican Ministry of Health in collaboration with the University of Saskatchewan.

By the end of this five-year program, the Massinga Centre aims to have provided training in preventative medicine to 570 health workers; continuing education training to 125 formal health workers, 500 community health workers, 500 community health activists, 1000 traditional healers and 100 midwives; and health worker teacher training to 45 new teachers. In addition, it will have increased its residential capacity from 60 concurrent students to 180 by constructing new classrooms, student accommodation and teacher housing. The project also aims to increase collaboration with other health training centres interested in the methodology developed by the Massinga Centre.

The Massinga Centre

In 2002, the University of Saskatchewan and Mozambique's Ministry of Health with the assistance of CIDA funding, officially inaugurated the Massinga Centre for Continuing Education in Health, the country's only training centre dedicated to upgrading the skills of existing health workers.

Since 2002, the Massinga Centre has (i) provided continuing education to 428 professional health workers, teachers and support staff and 390 community health activists; (ii) trained 109 students in pre-service preventive medicine; (iii) worked with 130 community health activists per month in community health promotion and disease prevention; (iv) trained 20 Mozambican teachers; and (v) become a nationally recognized centre for community-based health training.

Since approximately half of Mozambique's adult population is illiterate, information about practices important to good health and prevention of disease is not easily disseminated. The Massinga Centre has developed and uses a unique participatory methodology that responds to this need to engage communities to participate in activities for their own health improvement.

Contact Information

  • Office of the Minister of International Cooperation
    Michelle Coates
    Press Secretary
    819-953-6238
    or
    Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA)
    Media Relations Office
    819-953-6534
    media@acdi-cida.gc.ca