SOURCE: UroToday

October 24, 2006 13:00 ET

UroToday.com Reports of a Model That Predicts Survival Time in Patients With Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma

BERKELEY, CA -- (MARKET WIRE) -- October 24, 2006 -- UroToday (www.urotoday.com) reports on the July 1, 2006 issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology by Dr. Eggener and associates at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center of a model that stratifies patients with a recurrent renal cell carcinoma (RCCA) by risk factors to predict survival time. Christopher P. Evans, M.D. reports on the following:

The authors applied the criteria previously described by Dr. Robert Motzer for patients with metastatic RCCA.

A total of 118 patients with a recurrence of RCCA after nephrectomy or partial nephrectomy were eligible for analysis. Surveillance criteria were at the discretion of the surgeon. The numbers of adverse prognostic factors for each patient, according to Motzer, were categorized into low- (0 risk factors), intermediate- (1-2 risk factors) and high-risk (3-5 risk factors).

Mean patient age was 69 years and 69% were male. A total of 96% had a radical nephrectomy and 4% had a partial nephrectomy. Clear cell carcinoma was present in 79% of patients and stage pT3 or higher disease was present in 60%. Disease recurrence was in the lung in 64%, bone in 15%, liver in 11%, regional lymph nodes in 9% and renal fossa in 9%. Time from nephrectomy to recurrence was < 12 months in 50 patients (42%) and > 12 months in 68 patients (58%).

Median survival times for patients with 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 risk factors was 76, 25, 19, 5, 8 and 4 months, respectively. Median survival time was 76 months for the 34% in the low-risk group, 25 months for the 50% in the intermediate-risk group and 6 months for the 16% in the high-risk group. The 5-year survival rate for low-risk patients was 69%, for intermediate-risk patients it was 14% and for high-risk patients it was 0%.

This model is simple and useful to predict survival in patients with a recurrence of RCCA. An example of clinical application is for stratification of patients for clinical trials.

By Christopher P. Evans, M.D.

Reference:

J Clin Oncol 2006;24:3101-3106

http://www.jco.org/cgi/content/abstract/24/19/3101

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