Ipsos Reid

Ipsos Reid

July 30, 2005 06:00 ET

WHAT'S WITH THE HEAT?

Majority Of Canadians (56%) Believe Hot Weather Is Indicative Of Increased Global Warming; Half (52%) Say The Federal Government Is Doing A Poor Job Addressing Global Warming Issues Attention: Environment Editor, News Editor, Science Editor TORONTO, ON--(CCNMatthews - July 30, 2005) - The dog days of summer arrived early in many parts of Canada this year and the sweltering summer heat has caused many to wonder -what's with the heat? According to a majority of Canadians (56%) the very hot weather conditions experienced by many Canadians this summer are "part of a trend towards increased global warming". This compares to 43% who say it is "just an example of a very hot summer that Canada experiences every once in a while". These numbers are virtually unchanged from an August 2001 Ipsos-Reid survey when 55% said they felt that hot summer was indicative of increased global warming and 44% thought it was just an occasional hot summer.

Further, assessing whether the Federal government is doing a good job or not on this file appears to correlate directly as to whether Canadians believe the hot summer is due to global warming or more natural causes: Half (52%) of Canadians believe that the Federal government is doing either a "poor" (40%) or a "very poor" (12%) job when it comes to addressing this issue, compared to 44% that believe they are doing a "good job" (40% good/4% very good).

These are the findings of an Ipsos-Reid poll provided exclusively to CanWest/Global and conducted from July 12-14, 2005. For the survey, a representative randomly selected sample of 1001 adult Canadians were interviewed by telephone. With a sample of this size, the results are considered accurate to within ±3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20, of what they would have been had the entire adult Canadian population been polled. The margin of error will be larger within regions and for other sub-groupings of the survey population. These data were weighted to ensure the sample's regional and age/sex composition reflects that of the actual Canadian population according to the 2001 Census data.

Majority (56%) Believe Hot Weather This Summer Is Indicative Of A Trend Towards Increased Global Warming…

A majority of Canadians (56%) believe the very hot weather conditions experienced by many Canadians this summer are "part of a trend towards increased global warming". This compares to 43% who say it is "just an example of a very hot summer that Canada experiences every once in a while" - a further 1% "don't know".

These numbers are unchanged from an August 2001 Ipsos-Reid survey when 55% said they felt that hot summer was indicative of increased global warming and 44% thought it was just a hot summer that comes once in a while.

• Residents of Quebec (64%) and British Columbia (62%) are the most likely to believe the warm summer is indicative of increased global warming.
• Residents of Alberta and Saskatchewan/Manitoba (both at 52%) are the most likely to believe it is just an example of a warm summer that happens from time to time.
• Women are more likely than men to believe the heat reflects increased global warming (61% vs. 50%).

Half (52%) Believe Federal Government Has Been Doing "Poor Job" In Addressing Issues Concerning Global Warming…

When thinking about how the Federal Government has been doing in recent years to address concerns about global warming, half (52%) say they have been doing either a "poor job" (40%) or a "very poor job" (12%). Of the opposite opinion, are the 44% that believe the Federal Government has been doing a good job (40% good job/4% very good job). Four percent of Canadians "don't know" whether they have been doing a good or bad job.
Opinions are essentially unchanged from August 2001, when 53% said the Federal Government had been doing a poor job addressing concerns about this environmental issue.

• Residents of Quebec (52%) are the most likely to believe the Federal Government has been doing a good job, followed by residents of Alberta (44%) and Atlantic Canada (43%).
• Residents of British Columbia (59%) are the most likely to believe they have been doing a poor job, followed by residents of Ontario (54%) and Saskatchewan/Manitoba (53%).

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For more information on this news release, please contact:

John Wright
Senior Vice President
Ipsos-Reid
Public Affairs
(416) 324-2900

For full tabular results, please visit our website at www.ipsos.ca.
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