SOURCE: After School

After School

October 26, 2016 09:00 ET

Who Teens Want as Their President: Surprising Poll Results from the After School Election Center and Presidential Poll

SAN FRANCISCO, CA--(Marketwired - October 26, 2016) - The overwhelming majority of America's teens would vote for Donald Trump if they had the chance, according to a recent poll taken by over 100,000 teenagers on the After School app. With 47.08% of the overall vote, compared to 32.57% for Hillary Clinton, Republican Presidential Candidate Donald Trump was the clear favorite of high school students across the country.

The teen-only social network After School conducted the poll as part of its online "Election Center" -- an effort to raise the civic participation of Generation Z. The Election Center leveraged the expertise of partners DoSomething.org and Countable.us to educate teens on the candidates and issues, help them register and pre-register to vote, and volunteer with presidential campaigns. Michael Callahan, CEO of After School, said, "By getting teens involved in positive social activities at a young age, we open them up to a world where they can make their voice heard and make a significant difference in their communities and beyond. We're pleased that many of our users participated in the poll, and that tens of thousands went one step further to register or pre-register to vote and volunteer for a campaign."

The After School Presidential Poll allowed high school students ages 13-19 to cast a single vote for their favorite candidate. Students could pick either Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump, Jill Stein, or Gary Johnson as their choice for President.

In addition to winning the majority vote, Donald Trump beat Hillary Clinton in forty-two of the fifty states. Trump also took all eleven "swing states" in the poll: Colorado, Florida, Iowa, Michigan, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Wisconsin. The most popular reasons teens gave for their support of Trump included "he's not Hillary," "he'll help the economy," "he is going to lower taxes," and "he's a great business man."

Teens who voted for Hillary shared a wide variety of reasons for their support. "She believes in LGBTQ rights," "I'm a reasonable human being with a moral compass," "she is the most reasonable candidate," and "she represents all the things I hope for America and I really hate Donald Trump," were among the most common responses. Teens favored Hillary Clinton in California, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington.

Here are how today's teens will or would vote if of voting age:

  • Donald Trump - 47.08% (46% Female, 54% Male)
  • Hillary Clinton - 32.57% (65% Female, 35% Male)
  • Gary Johnson - 11.87% (54% Female, 46% Male)
  • Jill Stein - 8.47% (70% Female, 30% Male)

Females, with a total of 58,542 votes, selected: Donald Trump - 40%, Hillary Clinton - 38%, Gary Johnson 12%, Jill Stein 11%

Males, with a total of 48,066 votes, selected: Donald Trump - 57%, Hillary Clinton - 25%, Gary Johnson 12%, Jill Stein 6%

Third-party candidates received strong support from Generation Z with over 22,000 votes combined, accounting for approximately 20.3% of all teen votes. This support is more than double the 9% (Johnson 7%, Stein 2%) support for Gary Johnson and Jill Stein among likely voters nationally according to the latest poll conducted by NBC News/Wall Street Journal.

Libertarian Presidential Candidate Gary Johnson placed second behind Donald Trump in New Mexico with 29.8% to 35.4% for Trump. "He has the best ideas to help the country and similar views to my own," stated one After School user anonymously. Teens also showed support for Green Party Candidate Jill Stein, who received over 10% in Alaska (12.3%), Nevada (12%), Oregon (19.9%), Delaware (11.6%), Utah (10.8%), Vermont (11.1%), Washington (10.8%), and Hawaii (11.4%). "She has really good ideas and seems like she can actually make things happen and go through with them. She is obviously intelligent and I'd pick her over Trump or Hillary any day," said another student.

The Election Center will continue to be live in the app to help users register and pre-register through election day with the help of DoSomething.org. Over 70,000 students have pre-registered with After School to get help voting when they turn 18 and approximately 30,000 students chose to get involved with DoSomething.org's voter registration drive. "Voting in your first election is a big deal. DoSomething.org is thrilled to be a part of After School's Election Center to increase voter registration through our Lose Your V-Card campaign and voter turnout through our Find Your V-Spot campaign," said DoSomething.org CEO Aria Finger.

After School's millions of teens will learn about the issues and candidates courtesy of Countable.us, who provided details on each candidate for the After School Election Center. "Countable is thrilled to help make politics and policy accessible to our youngest generation, to foster and encourage their education and participation. If we are ever to see higher voting rates and greater civic engagement in America, we must start working with our youth now," said Countable Founder and CEO Bart Myers.

To help get young voters registered, visit DoSomething.org's "Lose Your V-Card" campaign here.

After School is a social network that fosters fun and creative online and offline experiences for America's teens in a positive and safe environment that does not tolerate cyberbullying, threats, or content that threatens the safety of our online community. Millions of students in more than 80% of U.S. high schools, are using After School -- making it the largest social network for teens.

DoSomething.org is a non-profit organization with the goal of motivating young people to take action around social changes through national campaigns and grants for projects that make an impact. With over 5.3 million members, DoSomething.org is one of the world's largest organizations for young people and social change.

Countable.us makes it quick and easy to understand the laws Congress is considering and streamlines the process of contacting lawmakers so you can tell them how you want them to vote on bills under consideration.

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Contact Information

  • Contact:
    Jeff Collins
    After School VP of Communications and Partnerships
    925-768-5464